The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


Gallery Talk :: Blog

Behind the Scenes: "Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction"

Wednesday, May 22: 10 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
An exclusive preview of the Rock Hall's new Rolling Stones exhibit

An exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the making of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's new exhibit highlighting 50 years of the Rolling Stones. The exhibit, Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction, opens to the public on May 24, 2013, and will span three floors, more than 4,000 square feet and feature hundreds of items -- instruments, clothes, handwritten correspondence, art, photographs and more -- from the Rolling Stones' amazing history as the "World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band."

Watch the video below for a sneak peek at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's new Rolling Stones exhibit.


continue Categories: Gallery Talk, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit

Gallery Talk: Beggars Banquet and the Rolling Stones at Hyde Park

Friday, July 12: 1:05 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
From pie fights to Hyde Park in 1969, the Rolling Stones' Beggars Banquet promo wall has seen a lot.

This month, the Rolling Stones returned to Hyde Park for two concerts, 44 years after the group's 1969 performance at the landmark venue. Delivering a set on July 6 that echoed that fabled show with performances of such classics as "Sympathy for the Devil" and "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," Mick Jagger reportedly asked: "Anybody here that was here in 1969?"

On July 5, 1969, the Rolling Stones took to a stage at London's Hyde Park, dedicating the show to founding member Brian Jones who had died just two days earlier. The performance in front of more than half a million people marked the first appearance of guitarist Mick Taylor with the group.

Jagger quoted poet Percy Bysshe Shelley in tribute to their departed bandmate, and two large panels promoting 1968's Beggars Banquet that pictured Jones were placed on the stage. The panels were enlarged from the original gatefold sleeve of Beggars Banquet, with its medieval-menagerie scene of the band. The promo panels were first used during the album's infamous press launch – an event that quite literally left the Rolling Stones and the heads of Decca Records with pie on their faces.

In the above ...


continue Categories: Gallery Talk, Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock

John Lennon, Yoko Ono and the Opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Tuesday, September 3: 2:41 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The 1964 Gibson J 160E played by John Lennon, on view in the Museum's Beatles exhibit

After a groundbreaking in June 1993 and the realizaition of architect IM Pei's stunning vision, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum opened to the public on the shores of Lake Erie in September 1995. The day culminated with a benefit concert at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, where an incredible roster of rock and roll legends took the stage: Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Al Green, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin, Johnny Cash, the Pretenders, John Fogerty, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop, George Clinton, the Kinks, John Mellencamp, Bruce Springsteen, Booker T and the MGs, Eric Burdon and Martha Reeves. It was just the start.

One of the first pieces of rock and roll history ever loaned to the Museum came from Yoko Ono: the 1964 Gibson J 160E played by John Lennon and used extensively throughout his career. The unique acoustic guitar was part of a collection Ono presented to the Museum on October 13, 1994 and also included handwritten lyrics, a pair of Lennon's eye glasses, Lennon's guitar from the 1965 Beatles concert at Shea Stadium and more.

The Gibson acoustic guitar, however, remains "one of the most precious artifacts that we have in the Rock ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Gallery Talk, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews

Gallery Talk: Duane Allman's 1959 Gibson Les Paul Guitars

Thursday, September 19: 11:30 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Duane Allman's highly prized 1959 Gibson Les Paul guitar, on exhibit at the Rock Hall

Few guitarists made as lasting an impression in such short order as Duane Allman. Beyond his work with the his namesake group and principal architects of Southern rock, the Allman Brothers Band, Duane was an in-demand session musician. A fixture at Muscle Shoals, Duane's playing can be heard on records by Aretha Franklin and Wilson Pickett, among others, and he famously traded licks with Eric Clapton on Derek and the Dominos' 1970 release Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

This 1959 cherry sunburst Gibson Les Paul was acquired by Duane in the fall of 1970, after he fell in love with the instrument jamming with a band called the Stone Balloon in Daytona Beach, Florida. The guitar can be heard on the seminal Allman Brothers Band live concert recording At Fillmore East. Recorded at the famed NYC concert hall on March 12 and 13, 1971, sprawling jams such as "Whipping Post," inspired blues including a cover of "Statesboro Blues" and fiery, jazz-inspired epics like "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" showcased Allman's near-singular dexterity and versatility as a true guitar virtuoso. 

Recently, the Gibson Custom Shop visited the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland with ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Gallery Talk, Inductee, Hall of Fame
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