The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


Hall of Fame :: Blog

2011 American Music Masters Honoree: Aretha Franklin

Tuesday, August 23: 7 a.m.
Honoring the "Queen of Soul"

In 1987, Aretha Franklin became the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame – a fitting tribute to the "Queen of Soul," the woman who for more than 50 years has been the expressive, passionate voice of soul music. More than 20 years later, Franklin continues to be a driving force in the world of music, and I am thrilled to announce her as The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's 2011 American Music Masters honoree. 

 

The American Music Masters series will honor Ms. Franklin with a weeklong celebration beginning on October 31, featuring special events presented by the Rock Hall and series partner Case Western Reserve University.

 

Aretha Franklin is a masterful singer, pianist, performer and arranger, whose catalog of recordings highlights a brilliant versatility that spans myriad genres: gospel, jazz, blues, pop standards, rock, funk – the list goes on. She constantly breaks down boundaries between styles of American music, revealing the connections between them, across generations. In the words of Princeton University professor Daphne Brooks, she has “reinvented the fabric of our musical culture.” In the process, she has inspired millions of people around the world to sing, to speak, to climb ...


continue Categories: American Music Masters, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Education, Event

Remembering Jerry Leiber

Tuesday, August 23: 5 p.m.
Posted by Terry Stewart
Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller

Yesterday, the music world lost one of its greatest poet laureates with the passing of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Jerry Leiber. As the lyricist on countless iconic chart topping songs and so many more hit records, Leiber not only wrote the words that everyone was singing, but also led the way in how we verbalized our feelings about the societal changes we were living with in post–World War ll life. Appropriately, his vehicles of choice were the emerging populist musical genres of rhythm and blues, and then rock and roll.

 

Beyond the songs he penned, the team of Leiber and Stoller (Mike Stoller) also produced an untold string of hits. Inducted together into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, they also saw their music become the basis for the longest running musical revue in Broadway history, Smokey Joe’s Café, a title lifted from one of their early hits by the Robins.

 

I loved the Robins/Coasters growing up. They represented to me the real gestalt of rock and roll, the music helping me call the shots on the important things in life – how I dressed, how I cut my hair, how I ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee

America's Foremothers

Monday, September 12: 11 a.m.
Bessie Smith

"America's Foremothers" is the first installment in a special series that highlights the evolution of women in music by placing their accomplishments, inspirations and influence in the context of the eras that shaped their sounds and messages. 

Between 1920 and 1947, roughly the period covered in the “Foremothers” section of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s Women Who Rock exhibit, American women made great strides toward gaining equality while championing basic human rights. Female musicians responded to the liberation evolving around them, forming a collection of voices that melodically – and often defiantly – set the tone that inspired generations of women. Leading the charge were the “Foremothers”: Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Mahalia Jackson and Mother Maybelle Carter.

Among the suffrage movement's greatest victories was the passing of the nineteenth amendment in 1920. The ensuing decades saw many more developments as women were elected to office, quite literally taking seats of power: state governor (Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming, 1924) and senator (Hattie Wyatt Caraway of Arkansas, 1932); and the first female member of the President’s cabinet, Francis Perkins, was appointed Secretary of Labor in 1933. The Women’s Amateur ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit

The 2011 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award

Tuesday, September 6: 9:14 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

For the second year in a row, we are pleased to learn a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame production is nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award!

The 2011 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony, produced by Line By Line Productions/Tenth Planet Productions and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, in association with FUSE, is nominated for Outstanding Musical Production by Paul Shaffer, Music Director.

Be sure to tune into FOX for the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, live on Sunday, September 18 at 8 p.m. EST for the results!


continue Categories: Other, Hall of Fame, Inductee

Today in Rock: Chrissie Hynde is Born

Wednesday, September 7: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Pretenders led by Chrissie Hynde

Akron native Chrissie Hynde is a rock pioneer and for decades the only constant in the lineup of 2005 Rock and Roll of Fame inductees, the Pretenders.  Born on September 7, 1951, she was one of the first women to front a popular rock band - not only as the singer, but also as main songwriter and bandleader - presenting a hard, unsentimental image that was far removed from the likes of Linda Ronstadt or Stevie Nicks. She seemed tough, and her songs, including “Tattooed Love Boys,” “Up the Neck” and “The Phone Call,”  could at times be unsparing, though she’d counterpoint those with sweeter tunes like “Kid” and “Don’t Get Me Wrong.”

In the early 1970s, Hynde moved to London in hopes of finding her footing in the music business. By 1978, budding vocalist and guitarist Hynde assembled the definitive Pretenders lineup with guitarist James Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon and drummer Martin Chambers – all from rustic Hereford. The band took off almost instantly, mastering the blistering pace and aggression of punk (fitting as she was friendly with members of the Sex Pistols and The Clash) though with added dimension. Hynde's songs possessed the melodic sheen of well-turned pop ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Exclusive Interviews

Today in Rock: Remembering Keith Moon

Wednesday, September 7: 5:03 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Who: (l-r) Keith Moon, Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and John Entwistle

In the pantheon of rock icons, few lived harder and played more dynamically than Keith Moon, among the greatest rock and roll drummers of all time and the man who embodied The Who's frenetic energy and unconventional wit. Although his eccentric persona earned him the unflattering nickname of "Moon the loon," his innovative drumming garnered accolades and made him one of the rock genre's most influential percussionists. His sphere of influence was wide, and legend has it that Moon suggested to Jimmy Page that he use the name Led Zeppelin – rather than Page's New Yardbirds moniker. On September 7, 1978, Moon passed away at the age of 32, when he overdosed on medications prescribed to combat alcoholism. Thirty-three years later, Moon's legacy can still be heard in The Who's oeuvre – and beyond.

Keith John Moon was born August 23, 1946, the son of Alfred and Kathleen Moon, and raised in Wembley, England. He began playing drums at an early age and after a period performing with the surf rock group The Beachcombers, he joined Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend and John Entwistle in London to form The Who. In their prime, the Mod "maximum R&B ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock

Elton John's World of Rock

Thursday, September 8: 12:01 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Sir Elton John

Tonight, Elton John's 2011 World Tour stops in Cleveland, Ohio, at Blossom Music Center, one of more than 100 dates that will take the charismatic, chart-topping musician to North and South America, Europe, Asia and Oceania. It's a suitably international schedule for one of the most successful musical artists of the modern era, one whose popularity ranks with – and longevity surpasses – Elvis Presley among rock and rollers. In 1992, he broke Presley’s record for the most consecutive years of Top 40 hits on Billboard’s singles chart, having been a continual presence in every year since “Your Song” debuted in December 1970.

Born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on March 25, 1947, Elton John and longtime lyricist and partner Bernie Taupin came to identify and shape the mood of the '70s from its inception. During 1971 alone, four new Elton John albums made their appearance on Billboard’s album chart: the western-themed Tumbleweed Connection; the soundtrack to an obscure film, Friends; the live album 11-17-70, recorded on that date at a New York radio station’s studio; and Madman Across the Water, which contained the favorites “Tiny Dancer,” “Levon” and the brooding title track. Honky Chateau, which appeared in ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exclusive Interviews

Celebrating the Life of Otis Redding

Friday, September 9: 1 p.m.
Otis Redding

Otis Redding would have celebrated his 70th birthday today, so we're delighted that the opening of the Rock Hall’s Otis Redding exhibit coincides with and commemorates his birth and remarkable life. The spotlight exhibit allows Redding's life and legacy to shine through with a collection of treasured personal effects and career mementos.

Otis Redding’s life and music embodied the essence of soul. He was a self-professed country boy from Macon, Georgia, and he had it all: a big, gravelly voice, an immense gift for songwriting and a generous, hardworking disposition. There was earthiness and candor in his every performance, be it slow, soulful ballads like “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” and “Try a Little Tenderness” or fast-paced numbers like “Respect” and “I Can’t Turn You Loose.” Producer Jerry Wexler said of Redding’s performances, “You could feel this plea coming from him.” Bassist Donald “Duck” Dunn of Booker T. and the MG’s recalled: “Otis would come in, and boy, he’d just bring everybody up. ‘Cause you knew something was gonna be different. When Otis was there, it was just revitalization of the whole thing. You wanted to play with Otis. He ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit
previous Page 2 of 26. next