The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum

Does Lady Gaga's Meat Dress Smell? (And Everything Else You Wanted to Know About the Dress!)

Friday, September 11: 1 a.m.
Posted by Ivan Sheehan

Where is Lady Gaga's meat dress now? Lady Gaga's meat dress at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio

Not known for subtlety, Lady Gaga made food for thought literal when she arrived at the 2010 MTV Video Music Awards sporting her infamous meat dress. That year, she won five awards, including Video of the Year for “Bad Romance,” but much of the chatter then – and now – focused on the wonderful and weird fashion statement.

"Well, it is certainly no disrespect to anyone that is vegan or vegetarian. As you know, I am the most judgment-free human being on the earth," said Gaga. "However, it has many interpretations. But for me this evening, if we don't stand up for what we believe in, and if we don't fight for our rights, pretty soon we're going to have as much rights as the meat on our own bones. And, I am not a piece of meat."

Five years later, it's safe and sound at the Rock Hall, but inquiring minds want to know: does Lady Gaga's meat dress smell? How is it not rotten? How long will it last? Here Rock Hall director of collections Jun Francisco answers all your meat dress questions. Read on:

How did the Rock Hall get the meat dress?

Jun ...

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The Stars Come Out For Darlene Love in New Music Video and Album

Thursday, August 27: 3:30 p.m.
Posted by Ivan Sheehan

Darlene Love 2015 New Music Video with Bruce Springsteen, Joan Jett, Bill Murray, David Letterman

The New York Times once declared that Darlene Love's “thunderbolt voice is as embedded in the history of rock and roll as Eric Clapton's guitar or Bob Dylan's lyrics.” A bold statement, but fitting for popular music's greatest sessions vocalist and backup singer – and among the most recognizable voices in rock and roll history. “I never pushed to be a star,” she told writer David Hinckley in 1992. “I didn’t want to. I had my home, my family. Session work let you do the music and leave.”

Among rock cognoscenti, Love is best known for “He’s a Rebel,” a song credited to the Crystals that was in actuality sung by Love and her vocal group, the Blossoms. That's a story unto itself. With the Blossoms, Love sang with the likes of Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, the Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, the Mamas and the Papas, Duane Eddy, Sonny and Cher, Frank Sinatra, Tom Jones, Luther Vandross and Dionne Warwick. And that is just the tip of the iceberg.

“One time I had to make a list of all the people I’ve worked for,” Love recalled in a 1985 Goldmine interview. “The ...

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Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll: "Born to Run"

Tuesday, August 25: 1:55 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall


Bruce Springsteen Born to Run handwritten lyrics Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland Ohio

In 1975, New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen was hailed as the new Dylan, the next great rock poet, the music's last prophet of social relevance. His picture graced the covers of Time and Newsweek (the same week, no less).By the time his third album, Born To Run, was released, Springsteen had added another archetype to the rock and roll pantheon: blue-collar hero, working-man's star. Born To Run's title track consolidated 25 years of rock and roll history into a universal tale of proletarian angst rendered larger than life by Spector-esque production.

Springsteen's protagonist does little more than motor down New Jersey's Highway 9 to flee small town drudgery. But to hear him tell it, he's headed down the road to glory. As the centerpiece of the hours-long sets that mark Springsteen's career, "Born To Run" provided uplift and catharsis, with the singer and foil/sax player Clarence Clemons engaging in joyous musical and physical interplay (captured in a live film clip that ranks with rock's most exhilarating concert footage).

On the surface, "Born To Run" may be little more than a song about cars and girls. Dig deeper, however, and rock ...

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Blood, Punk and The Curse of The Damned

Friday, August 21: 12 p.m.
Posted by Wes Orshoski

English punk rockers the Damned in 1977 in front of Stiff Records office photo by Ian Dickson

“Wanna die today? Wanna die today?” The Damned’s Captain Sensible and I are standing on a secluded stretch of sidewalk in Croydon, South London, just a stone’s throw from his childhood home, and we’re being mugged.

All in the span of two, maybe three seconds, someone’s unsuccessfully attempted to yank the Canon 5D camera off my shoulder, and now we’ve both spun around and are being barked at by a man gesturing to his left pocket, where he appears to be concealing a blade. “Wanna die today? Wanna die today?” he says as his eyes scan for passersby. 

It only takes Captain Sensible a half-second to realize that, actually, no, today isn’t a good day to die. And he bolts off down the road, disappearing around the corner, all six-plus-feet of him. I quickly realize I’m not going to be able to outrun this guy, so I make a beeline for my rental car parked about 100 yards away. Best I can hope for is to beat him to the car, toss the camera in the back and get the fuck out of there.

We’re told from an early age that if ...

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Julian Bond: "The Power of Rock and Roll brought Blacks and Whites Together"

Monday, August 17: 3:55 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Julian Bond speech, race and the history of rock and roll, 2010 Music Masters Cleveland, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

In 2010, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honored Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew as part of its annual Music Masters series saluting pioneering figures from the past half century. Among the many who took part in that weeklong celebration, in Cleveland, was Julian Bond.

An influential Civil Rights leader, politician, writer and professor, Bond, who passed away on August 15, 2015, provided among the more poignant remarks at the tribute to Domino and Bartholomew. He spoke of rock and roll's power to unite and the courage it required to deliver.

This is the full transcript of Bond's speech from the November 13, 2010 Music Masters tribute to Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew, including a poem he wrote when he was in college and published in first Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee newsletter.

"While [Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew] records were storming the charts, major challenges were being mounted against the forces of racial segregation and discrimination — the segregation that kept black and white rock and roll fans from listening to music or dancing together, that kept Domino and Bartholomew and their bands from restaurants and hotels on the road, the segregation that kept African Americans from voting ...

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The 50th Anniversary of the Beatles at Shea Stadium

Saturday, August 15: 3:47 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

On August 15, 1965, the Beatles performed before a crowd of more than 55,000 ecstatic fans in New York City’s Shea Stadium. That’s a lot of screaming.

The legendary performance was the first ever in a major U.S. stadium, and is known as perhaps the most famous Beatles’ concert – well, maybe that infamously cut short rooftop gig ranks higher.

The 1964 Ludwig drum kit played by Ringo Starr during that Shea Stadium gig was also used on six Beatles’ albums, as well as during their last official concert appearance in San Francisco’s Candlestick Park in 1966. Can you think of a more iconic drum set?

John Lennon’s 1964 Rickenbacker electric guitar used during the performance was one of two guitars made especially for Lennon while visiting America for the first time in 1964, and used on the Beatles second-ever Ed Sullivan appearance. It soon became his primary instrument, and still has the set list from Shea Stadium taped to the side.

Hard to believe that 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of that Beatles’ milestone – and that Beatlemania would still be alive and well! Both the Ringo Starr Ludwig drumkit and the John Lennon Rickenbacker ...

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Keith Richards Praises the Blues and Calls Sgt. Pepper's "Rubbish"

Wednesday, August 5: 3:40 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Keith Richards inducts Chuck Berry into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 1986 Induction Ceremony photo

Rolling Stones’ guitarist Keith Richards recently opened up about the genre he calls “the original music form in the world.”

“I recognize power when I see it,” Richards told Esquire magazine in an interview published in August 2015. “There's something incredibly powerful about the blues — the raw blues. There isn't a piece of popular music probably that you've heard that hasn't in some weird way been influenced by the blues.”

Richards also shared that he’s been lucky enough to meet and perform with all of his blues-based heroes. “All of these guys that I used to listen to – the amazing thing is that even at my age, I'm living in a place where I know all of my heroes, warts and all, and still love 'em,” said Richards. “Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis — man, if that is not 'Mr. Rock 'n' Roll,' I don't know who is. Little Richard; I love those cats.” Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard were all part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's first class in 1986.

“It’s very difficult for me to talk about Chuck Berry, because I lifted every lick ...

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The E Street Band's Nils Lofgren: "what Chuck Berry was to Keith Richards, Keith Richards is to me"

Tuesday, August 4: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Interview with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Nils Lofgren

During a recent tour stop in Cleveland, Ohio, we caught up with 2014 Hall of Fame Inductee, much-lauded solo artist, E Street Band guitarist and incredible storyteller Nils Lofgren who shared how he first became interested in playing the guitar, a faithful night seeing both the Who and Jimi Hendrix in concert, the influence of Keith Richards and the Rolling Stones, the Beatles; and the "god awful" music he and Bruce Springsteen made while backing Chuck Berry in Cleveland at the Rock Hall's opening concert.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Your first instrument as a child was the classical accordion. How did that come about? 

Nils Lofgren: Well, I spent eight years on the South Side of Chicago, where I was born. When I was five, every kid played accordion. I asked to take lessons, and I did. After the waltzes and polkas, you move in to classical or jazz. My teacher sent me in to classical accordion. It was an enormous musical study and backdrop, and, as a young teenager, I fell in love with the Beatles and Stones. Through them, I discovered the British invasion, the American counterpart of great rock bands in the 60s; Stax ...

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