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The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Green Day Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 12 p.m.

Building on the trail blazed by the Clash, the Sex Pistols and the Ramones, 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees Green Day are the perennial punk adolescents, true to the ethos of every basement and garage-rock band that preceded them. Here are my picks for essential Green Day listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Green Day

“Green Day”
Pitchfork said of this early Green Day outing: “It's raw stuff, but even at this point Green Day's records were at least halfway decently recorded, unlike most of their peers' tin-can-and-twine set-ups.”  This 1990 recording – although technically rough around the edges – showcases the group's knack for revved-up melodies.

“2000 Light Years Away”
“2000 Light Years Away” kicks off the 1992 album Kerplunk, Green Day’s last album on the indie Lookout! Records and the group’s first with drummer Tré Cool. The explosive blast of punk energy comes with a fantastic sing-along chorus and lyrics about genuine adolescent longing.

“Longview”
“Longview” was Green Day’s breakout hit, the first single released from their 1994 major label debut Dookie. PopMatters said: "This song didn’t become an instant classic of its genre merely because Armstrong said the word "masturbation" on the radio — it's all ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Ringo Starr Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 2 a.m.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Ringo Starr is one of the greatest and most creative drummers in rock and roll history. Throughout the Beatles’ career he sang on many lighthearted and funny songs (“Yellow Submarine,” “Octopus’s Garden”), providing sly humor and clever turns of phrase that helped cultivate the group’s image and persona. Starr was the first Beatle to have significant solo hits in the 1970s.  “Back Off Boogaloo,” “It Don’t Come Easy,” “Photograph,” “Oh My My” and “The No No Song” dominated the U.S. and U.K. charts. Here are my picks for essential Ringo Starr listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Ringo Starr

“It Don’t Come Easy”
George Harrison produced Ringo Starr’s first solo single, joined by Klaus Voorman on bass, Stephen Stills on piano and members of Badfinger on guitar and backing vocals. The buoyant melody flows freely on this infections track.

“Back Off Boogaloo”
This track clearly shows the influence of glam rock on Ringo Starr and features stinging slide guitar work from producer George Harrison.

“Photograph”
Ringo Starr co-wrote his first Number One solo hit with George Harrison. “Photograph” has  a “Wall of Sound” feel with lush, layered instruments, orchestrations and vocal tracks ...


continue Categories: The Beatles, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Paul Butterfield Blues Band Songs

Monday, April 13: 1 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee The Paul Butterfield Blues Band took the world by storm at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, expertly combining American rock and roll and the blues with Butterfield’s inspired harmonica and Mike Bloomfield’s explosive lead guitar. Their self-titled album released in 1965 and its follow-up, East-West in 1966, kicked open a door that brought a defining new edge to rock and roll. Here are my picks for essential Paul Butterfield Blues Band listening.

2105 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the Paul Butterfield Blues Band
 

“Born in Chicago”
This is the opening song on their first album and immediately establishes the group as a part of long history of electric Chicago blues (in the tracks of Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf).  The song was written by friend and collaborator Nick Gravenites who would go on to pen many classic psychedelic blues tunes in the years to come.



“Our Love is Drifting”
A slow blues burner written by the band’s two guitarists Bloomfield and Bishop. While the solos are enough to knock your socks off don’t ignore the great melodic call and response between the vocal and the guitar in the verses.

“Work Song”
While “Work Song” was originally written and recorded ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Event, Hall of Fame

Finding Bill Withers and Making "Still Bill"

Friday, April 10: 5:16 p.m.
Posted by Alex Vlack

As part of the Rock Hall's Celebration Day, the Museum will screen the Bill Withers documentary, Still Bill, at 5pm ET. In this post, the film's co-director (along with Damani Baker) Alex Vlack, shares how he found Bill Withers, his hero, and transformed the experience into a movie.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Bill Withers

Everyone who's ever turned on the radio, walked into a restaurant, been in a bar, lived in this country for more than a few days knows Bill Withers' biggest songs. But most people don't know his name, and most people don't know most of his music.

I didn't really discover it until college, when my friend Jon Fine turned me on to Still Bill, Withers' second record. We listened to it on cassette over and over and over. I'd grown up on blues and jazz and rock, and thought I was pretty well-versed – when you're 18 years old, you can think of yourself as a lot of things! – so how could an album like this have slipped past me? It was, simply, the best album I'd ever heard. Fine and I started a band, and one of the first things we did was ...


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Is "Transformer" Lou Reed’s Best Solo Work?

Friday, April 10: 3 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

The story of Lou Reed Transformer album 1972 art

In 1970, Lou Reed quit the Velvet Underground at the end of a nine-week performance residency at the famous rock club Max’s Kansas City (in New York City), leaving the VU album Loaded recorded but unmixed; and leaving the VU to continue on with none of its original members.

Two years later, Reed released his self-titled, first solo album on RCA records. The album was mostly made up of songs he had written for – and in some cases even performed live with – the Velvet Underground. While the release generated a lot of buzz, it turned out to be a critical and commercial flop. There are some strong songs, but even listening to it today it feels… well, lost. It doesn’t have the bite of the early VU songs like “Heroin,” nor the pop sensibilities of songs like “Sweet Jane.”  So with the album as disappointment to everyone including Reed, what to do next?

Bowie, Ronson and Reed

David Bowie and his guitarist Mick Ronson were longtime fans of the Velvet Underground and Lou Reed, so when it was suggested that they produce the next Reed album, they jumped at the chance.

Reed, for his part, was enamored with ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Event

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Bill Withers Songs

Thursday, April 9: 5:54 p.m.

TK


“Ain’t No Sunshine”
The song that set the framework for the Bill Withers sound with its sparse arrangement, direct,  no-frills lyric and in-the-pocket groove.
 
“Grandma’s Hands”
“I was one of those kids who was smaller than all the girls. I stuttered. I had asthma. So I had some issues," recalled Bill Withers. "My grandmother was that one person who would always say that I was going to be OK. … When you're a weaker kid, whoever champions you becomes very important to you."  
                                           
“Who Is He(and What is He to You?)”
Just the right undertone of menace and an unrelenting repeated funky riff drives   this testament of a jealous lover home. 
                          
“Lean on Me”
Bill Withers’ first Number One hit took us to church. "It's a rural song that translates across demographic lines,” Withers recalled. “My experience was, there were people who were that way. They would help you out. Even in the rural South, there were people who would help you out even across racial lines. Somebody who would probably stand in a mob that might lynch you if you pissed them off, would help you out in another way."
 
“I Can’t Write ...


continue Categories: Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, History of Rock and Roll, Exhibit, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Chris Isaak Shares Intimate Details of "Wicked Game" Music Video

Tuesday, March 3: 7 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Chris Isaak interview about 1989 Wicked Game music video and Helena Christensen

In advance of opening the latest Rock and Roll Hall of Fame exhibit Herb Ritts: The Rock Portraits on March, 13, 2015, the Rock Hall caught up with Chris Isaak for a look back at 1989's "Wicked Game" music video directed by Herb Ritts and featuring supermodel Helena Christensen.

What was the song "Wicked Game" about? Did the on-camera chemistry with supermodel Helena Christensen happen off-camera, too? What was photographer/director Herb Ritts' vision for the video? Chris Isaak answers all those questions and more.

Rock Hall: What was the song "Wicked Game" about?

Chris Isaak: It's about four in the morning, and somebody calling and saying I'm coming over to your house and I thought right after I said okay, I thought I should have never allowed this person to come over to my house.  I know what's going to happen.

And I wrote the song between the time I got off the phone and the person came over to visit. It was just about what happens when you have a strong attraction to people that aren't necessarily good for you.

I think it hit a nerve because I think a lot of us ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Exclusive Interviews

Public Enemy's Chuck D. and the Rap-Thrash Metal Gamble

Tuesday, February 24: 5:18 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Public Enemy in Rock Hall with Chuck D. visits Museum in Cleveland

Long Island, New York rap crew and Hall of Fame Inductees Public Enemy saw Armageddon everywhere and all of life as a struggle. Adding dissonance, noise and speed to the muscular hip hop of their idols Run-D.M.C., they came on as "Prophets of Rage" with ties to the Nation of Islam and an eye toward revolution.

That's some high-wire act to sustain, but while they walked it, Public Enemy's music was both viscerally and rhetorically scorching. And then they joined forces with a thrash metal group in 1991, recasting their 1987 single "Bring the Noise" as a rap-metal explosion that challenged perceptions and preempted a mainstream surge in rap-rock sounds by more than a decade.

The F**king Jugular of Doubt

"Bring the Noise" first emerged as a rap single from Public Enemy before its inclusion on 1988's It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back. Fittingly, the track's lyrics made arguments for rap's historical connections to rock and roll (Soul control, beat is the father of your rock 'n' roll). The track caught the ear of Anthrax and in 1991 the group recorded a new version with Public Enemy. A ...


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