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A Never-Before-Heard Johnny Cash Album Gets Release Date

Thursday, December 12: 3 p.m.
Posted by Alexandra Fagan
New Johnny Cash album: Out Among the Stars

“'I Walk the Line' was a hit in November of 1956, that’s about a year before I was born, so it really is a part of the world that I know. But that’s the way it seems with great songs and great artists. Their impact on people is such that you can’t imagine what the world would be like or sound like without them.”

That was Lyle Lovett describing the first Johnny Cash song he ever heard, when he inducted Cash at the 1992 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony (watch video of Lyle Lovett inducting Johnny Cash into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame).

“I Walk the Line” hit Number One on the country Billboard charts and crossed over into the pop Top 20. Nearly six decades after "I Walk the Line" – and more than a decade after his passing in 2003 at age 71 – new, never-before-heard material from The Man in Black is scheduled for release in Spring 2014.

Pictured (l-r): 1943 Martin acoustic guitar played by Johnny Cash during his Sun Records recording sessions from 1955 to 1958; c.1955 suit worn by Johnny Cash during his time with Sun Records ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Hall of Fame, Johnny Cash, History of Rock and Roll

Exclusive Interview with Robby Krieger of the Doors: Remembering Ray Manzarek, reconnecting with John Densmore and the Doors' Greatest Moments

Saturday, December 7: 9 a.m.
Posted by Jim Henke
Robby Krieger

Over the course of a short career that only lasted a little more than five years, the Doors had a tremendous impact on rock and roll. They were a truly unique group, with a singer, Jim Morrison, who was a genuine poet with an almost mythical persona. Unlike most bands at the time, the Doors did not have a bass player. Ray Manzarek played the bass lines on his keyboards. John Densmore was a solid, steady drummer. And Robby Krieger was an elegant guitarist with a distinctive style unlike the blues-based guitar leanings favored by most his six-string peers. 20 years after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, Robby Krieger sits down for an exclusive interview with the Rock Hall, reflecting on the passing of friend and bandmate Ray Manzarek, patching up differences with John Densmore, the Doors' greatest moments, where the Doors would've gone had Jim Morrison lived, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, what he's listening to now and more.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: First, let’s talk about Ray Manzarek’s death…. Did you see that coming? Had he been sick for a while?

Doors guitarist Robby Krieger with Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarak

Robby Krieger: Not really ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Inductee, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews, Today in Rock

40 Years Later: Guitarist Gary Rossington and Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Free Bird"

Wednesday, December 4: 3 p.m.
Posted by Alexandra Fagan
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Gary Rossington

On December 4, 1951, Gary Rossington was born. One of the founding members and guitarist of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Rossington played his way into Southern rock history.

This year marks Rossington’s 63rd birthday and also the 40-year anniversary of Lynyrd Skynyrd's debut album, (Pronounced 'leh-'nérd 'skin-'nérd), featuring the hit song “Free Bird.” The original 1973 version of "Free Bird" was truly wrenching: a nine-minute salute to a departed Southern brother Duane Allman, highlighted by Ronnie Van Zant's mournful vocals and relentless soloing from Allen Collins and Gary Rossington. (Skynyrd's trademark three-lead guitar lineup hadn't crystallized yet.) Rossington’s instrument of choice was his 1959 Gibson Les Paul guitar that is now on display in the Museum’s Architects of Rock exhibit. Fifties-era Gibson Les Paul guitars are among the most sought-after and costly guitars in the rock world, and when Rossington was finally able to purchase a 1959 model, he named it after his beloved mother Berneice. Rossington played slide guitar on “Free Bird.” (pictured below: Gary Rossington 1959 Gibson Les Paul, on exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum)

Despite saturation radio play since its first appearance ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Inductee, Hall of Fame, Today in Rock, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

The Byrds' Eulogy for John F. Kennedy: "He Was a Friend of Mine"

Friday, November 22: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Folk rock pioneers and 1991 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees the Byrds

In the early Sixties, Roger McGuinn had been playing with David Crosby and Gene Clark, billing themselves as the Beefeaters. When Chris Hillman and Michael Clarke joined that group in December 1964, they changed their name to the Byrds. Folk rock pioneers, the Byrds were once described by McGuinn as "Dylan meets the Beatles.” Fittingly, the group's first single, “Mr. Tambourine Man,” was written by Bob Dylan and reached Number One. They'd score another Number One hit in 1966 with "Turn! Turn! Turn!," based on a Bible passage set to music by Pete Seeger, but it was McGuinn's inspired reframing of a traditional folk song that made a poignant statement on 1965's Turn! Turn! Turn! album, transforming "He Was a Friend of Mine" into a eulogy for John F. Kennedy, two years after he was assassinated on November 22, 1963.

In 1965, the Byrds were charging forward, building their sound around the three-part harmonies of McGuinn, Clark and Crosby, and McGuinn's shimmering, jangling 12-string Rickenbacker guitar. Their album Turn! Turn! Turn! was released at the end of the year and its title track would go to Number One, but “He Was a Friend of Mine ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, History of Rock and Roll

Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones Pay Tribute to the Everly Brothers on "Foreverly"

Tuesday, November 19: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Everly Brothers circa 1958

The Everly Brothers' sound borrowed from Appalachian folk, bluegrass and country to form a dreamy, innocent style of rock and roll. Over the decades – particuarly in the Fifties and Sixties – the Everlys’ close-harmony style influenced the likes of the Hollies, Simon and Garfunkel, the Byrds and the Beatles, with Paul McCartney noting “They were and still are the very best.” Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in its inaugural year, 1986, the Everly Brothers are featured in the Museum's Cities and Sounds exhibit, in the Rave On section. There, visitors to the Museum will find the outfits worn by the brothers on the cover of The Fabulous Style of the Everly Brothers, as well as a 1963 Gibson Everly Brothers model featuring a split pick guard surrounding the sound hole that was meant to represent the brothers’ familial resemblance.

Watch + Listen: Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones "Silver Haired Daddy of Mine"

While best-known for such hits as "Cathy's Clown," "Bye Bye Love,""Wake Up Little Susie," and "All I Have to Do Is Dream," in 1958, Don and Phil Everly surprised fans when they shifted tack, paying homage to their Tennessee roots. On Songs ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, The Beatles, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Interview with Peter Asher, half of legendary duo Peter & Gordon

Monday, November 4: 4:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Peter Asher in 2011 / photo by Michael Weintrob

Peter Asher’s legendary music career began in 1964 with the formation of Peter & Gordon. In 1968, Asher became head of A&R for the Beatles newly formed record company, Apple Records. Three years later, Asher decided to literally head in a different direction and moved to the U.S., where he founded Peter Asher Management. Peter Asher Management became one of the most successful artist management companies in America, handling artists such as Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman, James Taylor, Linda Ronstadt and Carole King. Asher has produced 12 Grammy Award-winning recordings, and in 1977 and 1989 was honored individually with the Grammy Award for “Producer of the Year.” Playing select dates now, Asher stopped by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, to talk about his recent projects, keeping current, and being among the first people to ever hear the Beatles "I Want to Hold Your Hand" when Paul McCartney was staying at his house.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Tell us about the dates you're playing now...

Peter Asher: It's not really a tour it's just occasional dates. I have so much fun doing it. To be honest, I ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews

Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's Why Archives Matter

Friday, November 1: 1:34 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Inside the Rock Hall's Library and Archives

Recently, music journalist Ann Powers wrote a piece for NPR titled "Holding Music History in Your Hands: Why Archives Matter." In it, Powers notes that she's planning "to head next to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library in Cleveland, which has served thousands of visitors – students, scholars and plenty of just-fans – since opening last year." In advance of her visit, she connected with Rock Hall Library and Archives director Andy Leach, who shared a story of one young visitor connecting with the Sex Pistols, in a new way.

"A couple of weeks ago, our head archivist told me a story about a teenage boy who came in with his family," Leach explained. "They were all looking at books and periodicals and watching videos, and the kid asked whether we had his favorite album, the Sex Pistols' Never Mind the Bollocks, on vinyl. He'd never actually seen a vinyl copy until then, and he was very excited. He very reverentially played the record in our Archives Reading Room while he pored over the album cover. He listened to the entire first side before it was time for his family to leave, at which point he begrudgingly rejoined ...


continue Categories: History of Punk, Library and Archives

Exclusive Interviews Backstage at Rock Hall's 2013 Rolling Stones Tribute Concert

Saturday, October 26: 1:36 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Guitarist Earl Slick talks backstage with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

On October 26, 2013, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, as part of its annual Music Masters program honored the music of the Rolling Stones at a special tribute concert. In this clip, the Rock Hall goes backstage for exclusive interviews with guitarist Earl Slick ("Everything about Keith [Richards] – musically, fashion-wise, his attitude –  it just rang a bell with me right from day one… and it still does today."), singer Lee Fields ("Mick Jagger is the most unique singer I've ever seen. He brings so much life to what he sings."), guitarist and Drive-by Truckers co-founder Patterson Hood ("Many of my lifelong idols are up there."), guitarist and Soul Asylum founding member Dave Pirner ("All through my life, I've been a Rolling Stones fan.") and Hall of Fame Inductee Chuck D. of Public Enemy ("It's about being true: The Rolling Stones have always been true and paid homage to where they came from. I mean, they named their group after a Muddy Waters' Record [which] is a bold statement.") to discover what the Rolling Stones' music has meant to them, why they're paying tribute to the Stones, including Mick Jagger ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, American Music Masters, Exclusive Interviews
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