The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


blues :: Blog

Jerry Fuller and the Amazing True Story of Ricky Nelson's "Travelin' Man"

Friday, November 22: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller wrote "Travelin' Man"

In 1960s Los Angeles, California, an elite group of studio session musicians came together and played on hits for the Beach Boys, the ByrdsRicky Nelson, Elvis Presley, Simon and GarfunkelPhil Spector's "Wall of Sound," Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Jan & Dean, the Monkees, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, 5th Dimension, Tijuana Brass and Johnny Rivers among others. From "Be My Baby" to "California Girls;" "Strangers in the Night" and "Mrs. Robinson;" "You've Lost that Lovin' Feelin'" and "Up, Up and Away;""Viva Las Vegas" to "Mr. Tambourine Man," the group dubbed "The Wrecking Crew" played on some of rock and roll's most-beloved songs. “The musicians really are the unsung heroes of all these hit records,” noted Nancy Sinatra. And now the world will know their story – if all goes to plan.

Watch + Listen: American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller tells the story of how he wrote "Travelin' Man" for Sam Cooke, recorded it with Glen Campbell, and how the demo went in the garbage before finding its way to Ricky Nelson. (From The Wrecking Crew: The Untold Story of Rock & Roll Heroes)

Among the musicians in the "Crew" was guitarist Tommy ...


continue Categories: Elvis Presley, Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews

Rolling Stone's First Issue: "A Rolling Stone Gathers No Moss"

Saturday, November 9: 9:01 a.m.
Posted by Alexandra Fagan
John Lennon as Private Gripeweed on the cover of Rolling Stone's first-ever issue.

You're probably wondering what we are trying to do. It's hard to say: sort of a magazine and sort of a newspaper. The name of it is Rolling Stone, which comes from an old saying: "A Rolling Stone gathers no moss." Muddy Waters used the name for a song he wrote; The Rolling Stones took their name from Muddy's song, and "Like A Rolling Stone" was the title of Bob Dylan's first rock and roll record.

We have begun a new publication reflecting what we see are the changes in rock and roll and the changes related to rock and roll. Because the trade papers have become so inaccurate and irrelevant, and because the fan magazines are an anachronism, fashioned in the mold of myth and nonsense, we hope that we have something here for the artists and the industry, and every person who "believes in the magic that can set you free."

Rolling Stone is not just about music, but also about the things and attitudes that the music embraces. We've been working quite hard on it and we hope you can dig it. To describe it any further would be difficult without sounding ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Today in Rock, The Grateful Dead, Rolling Stones, Inductee, Hall of Fame, History of Rock and Roll

Exclusive Interviews Backstage at Rock Hall's 2013 Rolling Stones Tribute Concert

Saturday, October 26: 1:36 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Guitarist Earl Slick talks backstage with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

On October 26, 2013, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, as part of its annual Music Masters program honored the music of the Rolling Stones at a special tribute concert. In this clip, the Rock Hall goes backstage for exclusive interviews with guitarist Earl Slick ("Everything about Keith [Richards] – musically, fashion-wise, his attitude –  it just rang a bell with me right from day one… and it still does today."), singer Lee Fields ("Mick Jagger is the most unique singer I've ever seen. He brings so much life to what he sings."), guitarist and Drive-by Truckers co-founder Patterson Hood ("Many of my lifelong idols are up there."), guitarist and Soul Asylum founding member Dave Pirner ("All through my life, I've been a Rolling Stones fan.") and Hall of Fame Inductee Chuck D. of Public Enemy ("It's about being true: The Rolling Stones have always been true and paid homage to where they came from. I mean, they named their group after a Muddy Waters' Record [which] is a bold statement.") to discover what the Rolling Stones' music has meant to them, why they're paying tribute to the Stones, including Mick Jagger ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, American Music Masters, Exclusive Interviews

Steve Jordan and Bobby Keys Talk about History with the Rolling Stones

Friday, October 25: 5:01 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

On October 26, 2013, in Cleveland, Ohio, musician and producer Steve Jordan lead an all-star band during a tribute concert honoring the music of the Rolling Stones. The event is part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's 18th Annual Music Masters series. Also in the band are Hall of Fame Inductees Chuck D. of Public Enemy and Ian McLagan of the Small Faces/Faces, as well as Sugar Blue, Merry Clayton, Sarah Dash, Lee Fields, Bernard Fowler, Patterson Hood, Cyril Jordan, Bobby Keys, Trevor Lawrence, Nils Lofgren, Steve Madaio, Dave Pirner, Earl Slick, Waddy Wachtel, Willie Weeks and Chris Wilson. 

In this interview, Steve Jordan and saxophonist Bobby Keys talk about putting together the Rolling Stones tribute concert, what it's like recording and performing with the Rolling Stones, favorite Rolling Stones' songs and more.


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Event, Rolling Stones, American Music Masters, Exclusive Interviews

Interview with Bill Janovitz, author of "Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell the Story of the Rolling Stones"

Tuesday, October 22: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Tonight, Bill Janovitz will discuss his recent book Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell the Story of The Rolling Stones at Cuyahoga Community College’s Tommy LiPuma Center for Creative Arts in the Black Box Theater (adjacent to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s Library and Archives, 2809 Woodland Avenue, Cleveland). The event is part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's 18th annual Music Masters series, honoring the music of the Rolling Stones. For the complete schedule of Music Masters events, including Saturday's Rolling Stones tribute concert, click here.

In Rocks Off, Janovitz – also singer, guitarist, and songwriter in the band Buffalo Tom – shares the story of the Rolling Stones as told through 50 of their most representative songs. Janovitz is also the author of Exile on Main Street (from the critically acclaimed 33 1/3 series) about the iconic Stones album. 

In advance of tonight's event, Janovitz toured the Museum in Cleveland, including Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction. He sat down with the Rock Hall to discuss how he came up with Rocks Off concept, how he narrowed down the Rolling Stones' catalog to just 50 songs and why ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, American Music Masters, Education, Exclusive Interviews

The Roots and Definition of Rock and Roll

Friday, October 18: 11:15 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Tracing the roots of and defining rock and roll music at the Museum.

How do you define rock and roll?

Each year, with the announcement of the next class of nominees for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a debate swirls as to what music is considered "rock and roll." The announcement of the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees – the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Chic, Deep Purple, Peter Gabriel, Hall and Oates, Kiss, LL Cool J, the Meters, Nirvana, N.W.A., the Replacements, Linda Ronstadt, Cat Stevens, Link Wray, Yes and the Zombies – brought with it passionate discussions as to not only who should be inducted, but also how the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and people all over the world interpret and define rock and roll. 

Visitors to the Museum in Cleveland will find a large type-and-graphics treatment featured in the Main Exhibit Hall, just before the Roots of Rock exhibit. It marks the unofficial start to a tour of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, and explains the roots of rock and roll, and how the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame recognizes rock and roll today. It reads as follows:

Rock and roll is a form of ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, History of Punk, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Inductee, Hall of Fame, Exhibit

10 Things You Might Not Have Known About The Rolling Stones' "Sticky Fingers"

Wednesday, October 9: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

The fans voted, and we listened: the Rolling Stones album to be highlighted during tonight's special listening party in the Museum's Foster Theater will be the group's 1971 classic recording Sticky Fingers. After asking fans to decide what Rolling Stones album the Rock Hall should highlight, the votes were tallied and Sticky Fingers rose to the top. Tonight, visitors can listen to the entire album through the Museum's state-of-the-art Foster Theater sound system and take part in an in-depth look at the record led by the Rock Hall's education department. Tune in to the live stream at 8 pm EST here! The Rock Hall will honor the Rolling Stones as the 2013 Music Masters during the week of October 21

Released in 1971, Sticky Fingers captured the sound of the Rolling Stones' inimitable, insouciant style. The album was released less than a year after the group launched its own record label – aptly named Rolling Stones Records – for which they signed a distribution deal with Atlantic Records. The initial releases on the new label were Sticky Fingers and its raunchy, rocking first single, “Brown Sugar.” Musically, the album showcased the band's versatility, from the country ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, Education, Foster Theatre, Rock and Roll Night School

Gallery Talk: Duane Allman's 1959 Gibson Les Paul Guitars

Thursday, September 19: 11:30 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Duane Allman's highly prized 1959 Gibson Les Paul guitar, on exhibit at the Rock Hall

Please note that these guitars are no longer on exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio.

Few guitarists made as lasting an impression in such short order as Duane Allman. Beyond his work with the his namesake group and principal architects of Southern rock, the Allman Brothers Band, Duane was an in-demand session musician. A fixture at Muscle Shoals, Duane's playing can be heard on records by Aretha Franklin and Wilson Pickett, among others, and he famously traded licks with Eric Clapton on Derek and the Dominos' 1970 release Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

This 1959 cherry sunburst Gibson Les Paul was acquired by Duane in the fall of 1970, after he fell in love with the instrument jamming with a band called the Stone Balloon in Daytona Beach, Florida. The guitar can be heard on the seminal Allman Brothers Band live concert recording At Fillmore East. Recorded at the famed NYC concert hall on March 12 and 13, 1971, sprawling jams such as "Whipping Post," inspired blues including a cover of "Statesboro Blues" and fiery, jazz-inspired epics like "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" showcased Allman's near-singular dexterity and versatility ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Gallery Talk, Inductee, Hall of Fame
previous Page 4 of 8. next