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The Rock Hall's 19th Annual Music Masters series will Honor 1986 Inductees The Everly Brothers

Thursday, July 10: 2 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and Case Western Reserve University will honor rock and roll pioneers the Everly Brothers during the 19th Annual Music Masters® series this October. Don and Phil Everly were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a part of the first class of inductees in 1986.  Two-time Grammy Award winner Rodney Crowell will serve as musical director for the tribute concert, which will take place on Saturday, October 25 at 7:30 p.m. at PlayhouseSquare’s State Theatre. Tribute concert artists will be announced in the coming months.

“I’m honored and proud as I know Phil would be for the recognition being given to the Everly Brothers,” said Don Everly. “I’d like to thank the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and fans for keeping the Everly Brothers alive and accept with great appreciation this special celebration. I wish Phil were here to share this honor with me. It has cost many tears and taken many miles and several decades to arrive at this point.”

Phil Everly passed away in January of this year, shortly before his 75th birthday. His family shared their thoughts on the ...


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Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll: "Bye Bye Love" and "All I Have To Do Is Dream"

Thursday, July 10: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

"Bye Bye Love" galvanized not one but three creative teams. Don and Phil Everly were floundering prior to this first hit single. "Bye Bye Love" was also the biggest hit to date for husband-and- wife songwriters Boudleaux and Felice Bryant. Last but not least, the pairing of the Bryants with the Everlys yielded a string of rock and roll pearls. The record's enormous success-Top Five on Billboard's country, pop, and R&B charts-followed a series of hurdles. Cadence, the Everlys' label, had rejected them once before but was giving the brothers a second chance. The Bryants' tune had been rejected by numerous artists before the Everlys got hold of it. Perhaps Don Everly's own guitar introduction made a difference; the brothers' close vocal harmonies were certainly new to a non-country audience. Not even a cover version by Webb Pierce-at that time the kiss of death for a country song's original recording-could slow the Everlys' million sales, as "Bye Bye Love" leapt across musical borderlines. The brothers went from tent shows to The Ed Sullivan Show; the era's top vocal duo was off and running.

The Everlys' third hit was their first ballad single.  If their ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

The Top 5 Things We Witnessed at the 2014 Nelsonville Music Festival

Thursday, June 5: 12 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Avett Brothers headline Saturday night at the 2014 Nelsonville Music Festival

This past weekend, we headed for the rolling hills of Southeastern Ohio for the 10th annual Nelsonville Music Festival. Family-friendly, ecologically-minded and produced by the non-profit Stuart's Opera House, the festival aims to have an impact on the region and the attendees who will take those missions home. Here are a handful of the top elements and moments we witnessed at the gathering.

SLIDESHOW: THE 2014 NELSONVILLE MUSIC FESTIVAL

1) Pokey LaFarge 

The sound of Pokey LaFarge proves there is no such thing as "revival" music, rather, it lives forever. The Bloomington, Illinoise born musician combines elements of swing, country and folk for a unique blend of authentic Americana. Besides seeing Pokey and his 5-piece backing band (which includes bassist Joey Glynn, guitarist Adam Hoskins, Ryan Koenig on harmonica, washboard, and snare drum; TJ Muller on cornet and trombone; and Chloe Feoranzo on clarinet and saxophone) on the main stage, we witnessed an unplugged set on the front porch of the No-Fi cabin on the back of the festival grounds. It was a scene right out of the earliest of music festivals, where people tightly gathered to hear the songs of troubadours and traveling ramblers. 

2) Musicians interacting with ...


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2014 Hall of Fame Inductions: 5 Essential Linda Ronstadt Songs

Tuesday, April 8: 8:30 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Linda Ronstadt dominated popular music in the 1970s with a voice of tremendous range and power. She was one of the most important voices in the creation of country rock, in part because she understood how to sing traditional country songs like “Silver Threads And Golden Needles.” She regularly crossed over to the country charts in the ’70s, a rarity for rock singers. Working with producer Peter Asher, Ronstadt crafted a repertoire of songs that roamed throughout rock history that she interpreted with beautiful, precise phrasing. Ronstadt was especially good at singing early rock and roll; she had a long string of hits that revived interest in rock’s pioneers: Roy Orbison’s “Blue Bayou,” the Everly Brothers' “When Will I Be Loved” and Buddy Holly’s “That’ll Be The Day” among them. She was equally comfortable with Motown music and the beginning of new wave. Her finest work was the run of four consecutive platinum albums in the mid 70s: Heart Like A Wheel (1974), Prisoner In Disguise (1975), Hasten Down The Wind (1976) and Simple Dreams (1977). In the 1980s, she expanded her musical vocabulary by recording songs from the classic American songbook (What’s New, Lush ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Rolling Stones, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

From Sam Cooke to Eric Clapton: 7 Degrees of "Danny Boy"

Monday, March 17: 3 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Although it originated in Ireland, the tune and melody of "Londonderry Air" is known worldwide, its flowing cadence inextricably linked to Irish heritage. When English lawyer and songwriter Frederic Weatherly was introduced to the tune in 1913, he recast lyrics he'd previously penned to match the "Londonderry" melody, giving rise to "Danny Boy,"arguably the most celebrated version of the song.

For more than a century, the stirring folk ballad has been adapted by a diverse cast of performers, including various Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees. Here, we look at versions of "Danny Boy" by Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash, Jackie Wilson, Roy Orbison, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Eric Clapton.

Sam Cooke

Cooke cut a beautifully soul-infused version of "Danny Boy" for his 1958 self-titled debut album, adding a charismatic lilt to the arrangement.

Johnny Cash

Cash recorded a hauntingly solemn version of "Danny Boy" for his 1965 Columbia Records release Orange Blossom Special, an album that included various folk and country standards as interpreted by the incomparable Man in Black.

Jackie Wilson

Wilson, who could effortlessly transition from rock to blues to soul, transformed "Danny Boy" – reportedly one of his mother's favorite songs – in ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

Johnny Cash Performs with Louis Armstrong in Rare TV Performance

Wednesday, February 26: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Hall of Fame Inductees Louis Armstrong and Johnny Cash perform together on Cash's TV show in 1970.

What happens when two musical giants collide, when two Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees defying genres and generations share the stage? On October 28, 1970 just that happened on Johnny Cash's TV variety show, when he welcomed "the great Louis Armstrong." Cash opened the introduction, remarking: "This country has given the world three original art forms – country music, jazz and Louis Armstrong."

Promoting his 1970 collection of country and western standards (fittingly titled Country & Western) and sporting an oversized cowboy hat, Armstrong sang "Crystal Chandeliers," the country classic originally sung by Charley Pride; and "Ramblin' Rose," a song made popular by Nat King Cole.

With the performance wrapped, Armstrong took a seat beside Cash, both musicians holding their instruments of choice: a trumpet and a guitar, respectively. "You've been at it a long time," Cash said to Armstrong. "I know that. We did a little research on some of your recordings; we find that on July 16, 1930, you played trumpet on a session with the late Jimmie Rodgers, the Father of Country Music. That was in Hollywood, right?"

Armstrong explained the ostensibly unlikely pairing: "We had a meeting one morning and Jimmie said, 'Man, I ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Hall of Fame, Johnny Cash

A Never-Before-Heard Johnny Cash Album Gets Release Date

Thursday, December 12: 3 p.m.
Posted by Alexandra Fagan
New Johnny Cash album: Out Among the Stars

“'I Walk the Line' was a hit in November of 1956, that’s about a year before I was born, so it really is a part of the world that I know. But that’s the way it seems with great songs and great artists. Their impact on people is such that you can’t imagine what the world would be like or sound like without them.”

That was Lyle Lovett describing the first Johnny Cash song he ever heard, when he inducted Cash at the 1992 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony (watch video of Lyle Lovett inducting Johnny Cash into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame).

“I Walk the Line” hit Number One on the country Billboard charts and crossed over into the pop Top 20. Nearly six decades after "I Walk the Line" – and more than a decade after his passing in 2003 at age 71 – new, never-before-heard material from The Man in Black is scheduled for release in Spring 2014.

Pictured (l-r): 1943 Martin acoustic guitar played by Johnny Cash during his Sun Records recording sessions from 1955 to 1958; c.1955 suit worn by Johnny Cash during his time with Sun Records ...


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Jerry Fuller and the Amazing True Story of Ricky Nelson's "Travelin' Man"

Friday, November 22: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller wrote "Travelin' Man"

In 1960s Los Angeles, California, an elite group of studio session musicians came together and played on hits for the Beach Boys, the ByrdsRicky Nelson, Elvis Presley, Simon and GarfunkelPhil Spector's "Wall of Sound," Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Jan & Dean, the Monkees, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, 5th Dimension, Tijuana Brass and Johnny Rivers among others. From "Be My Baby" to "California Girls;" "Strangers in the Night" and "Mrs. Robinson;" "You've Lost that Lovin' Feelin'" and "Up, Up and Away;""Viva Las Vegas" to "Mr. Tambourine Man," the group dubbed "The Wrecking Crew" played on some of rock and roll's most-beloved songs. “The musicians really are the unsung heroes of all these hit records,” noted Nancy Sinatra. And now the world will know their story – if all goes to plan.

Watch + Listen: American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller tells the story of how he wrote "Travelin' Man" for Sam Cooke, recorded it with Glen Campbell, and how the demo went in the garbage before finding its way to Ricky Nelson. (From The Wrecking Crew: The Untold Story of Rock & Roll Heroes)

Among the musicians in the "Crew" was guitarist Tommy ...


continue Categories: Elvis Presley, Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews
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