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The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Ringo Starr Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 2 a.m.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Ringo Starr is one of the greatest and most creative drummers in rock and roll history. Throughout the Beatles’ career he sang on many lighthearted and funny songs (“Yellow Submarine,” “Octopus’s Garden”), providing sly humor and clever turns of phrase that helped cultivate the group’s image and persona. Starr was the first Beatle to have significant solo hits in the 1970s.  “Back Off Boogaloo,” “It Don’t Come Easy,” “Photograph,” “Oh My My” and “The No No Song” dominated the U.S. and U.K. charts. Here are my picks for essential Ringo Starr listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Ringo Starr

“It Don’t Come Easy”
George Harrison produced Ringo Starr’s first solo single, joined by Klaus Voorman on bass, Stephen Stills on piano and members of Badfinger on guitar and backing vocals. The buoyant melody flows freely on this infections track.

“Back Off Boogaloo”
This track clearly shows the influence of glam rock on Ringo Starr and features stinging slide guitar work from producer George Harrison.

“Photograph”
Ringo Starr co-wrote his first Number One solo hit with George Harrison. “Photograph” has  a “Wall of Sound” feel with lush, layered instruments, orchestrations and vocal tracks ...


continue Categories: The Beatles, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll

Behind the Scenes: "Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction"

Wednesday, May 22: 10 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
An exclusive preview of the Rock Hall's new Rolling Stones exhibit

An exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the making of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's new exhibit highlighting 50 years of the Rolling Stones. The exhibit, Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction, opens to the public on May 24, 2013, and will span three floors, more than 4,000 square feet and feature hundreds of items -- instruments, clothes, handwritten correspondence, art, photographs and more -- from the Rolling Stones' amazing history as the "World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band."

Watch the video below for a sneak peek at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's new Rolling Stones exhibit.


continue Categories: Gallery Talk, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit

On Exhibit: The Black Keys

Monday, February 11: 5:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Patrick Carney of the Black Keys' Ludwig bass drum, on exhibit at the Rock Hall

Akron’s Black Keys are guitarist and vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer and producer Patrick Carney. The duo came together in 2001 and released its first album, The Big Come Up, in 2002. Besides traditional CDs or downloads, the Black Keys’ work has gained wide exposure in a number of different media, from film soundtracks to commercials to video games. Their 2010 album, Brothers, won three Grammys and was named Number Two on Rolling Stone magazine’s Best Albums of 2010 list. El Camino, released in 2011, peaked at Number Two on the Billboard 200 chart and was nominated for five Grammys.

On Sunday, February 10, 2013, the Black Keys took home three Grammy Awards, effectively sweeping the rock categories, winning Best Rock Album for El Camino and Best Rock Song for "Lonely Boy." Auerbach won for Producer of the Year. The Black Keys are among the artists featured in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Right Here, Right Now exhibit. On display are Carney's Ludwig Scotch Marching Bass Drum circa 1958, which is pictured in the artwork of The Big Come Up (left), as well as Auerbach's Maestro Model MFZ Fuzz effects ...


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Behind the Scenes: Rage Against the Machine's Tour Van

Monday, January 28: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Rock Hall director of collections management Jun Francisco with RATM's Brad Wilk's bass drum

In early 2013, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, unveiled a new collection of Rage Against the Machine artifacts, including this Chevrolet Astro van owned by Tom Morello and used by the band in its earliest days. In this behind-the-scenes video, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's director of collections management Jun Francisco shares the making of the exhibit, from its arrival at the Rock Hall's secret storage facility to collecting Rage Against the Machine instruments to moving the van into the Museum in Cleveland to readying everything for exhibition. Tom Morello shares the backstory of the van.


continue Categories: Gallery Talk, Exhibit, Exclusive Interviews

Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll: "Peggy Sue"

Friday, June 29: 12:29 p.m.
Posted by Shelby Morrison
Buddy Holly and the Crickets' "Peggy Sue" is one of the Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

On Monday, July 1, 1957, Buddy Holly and the Crickets set up their equipment in Clovis, New Mexico, at the Norman Petty Recording Studio to lay down the songs “Peggy Sue,” “Oh Boy,” “Listen to Me” and “I’m Gonna Love You Too.” During the session, they unwittingly had a special guest – a real cricket had found its way into the echo chamber and ended up on two of the songs, “Listen to Me” and “I’m Gonna Love You Too.” All attempts at trapping the serendipitous cricket had failed, so they kept the tape rolling.

Holly had brought a song called “Cindy Lou” to Clovis to record. This song eventually became the hit “Peggy Sue.” Originally, Holly composed the song using the name “Cindy,” after his sister Pat’s small daughter; and “Lou,” after Pat’s middle name. “Cindy Lou” was already being featured in the Cricket’s stage set, played to a Latin beat. When the Crickets began rehearsal for the songs, drummer J.I. Allison warmed up with a hard, pounding double paradiddle beat with no cymbals on his snare drum. Holly liked the sound and suggested that they use it on “Cindy Lou” and the ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

Today in Rock: Remembering Keith Moon

Wednesday, September 7: 5:03 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The Who: (l-r) Keith Moon, Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey and John Entwistle

In the pantheon of rock icons, few lived harder and played more dynamically than Keith Moon, among the greatest rock and roll drummers of all time and the man who embodied The Who's frenetic energy and unconventional wit. Although his eccentric persona earned him the unflattering nickname of "Moon the loon," his innovative drumming garnered accolades and made him one of the rock genre's most influential percussionists. His sphere of influence was wide, and legend has it that Moon suggested to Jimmy Page that he use the name Led Zeppelin – rather than Page's New Yardbirds moniker. On September 7, 1978, Moon passed away at the age of 32, when he overdosed on medications prescribed to combat alcoholism. Thirty-three years later, Moon's legacy can still be heard in The Who's oeuvre – and beyond.

Keith John Moon was born August 23, 1946, the son of Alfred and Kathleen Moon, and raised in Wembley, England. He began playing drums at an early age and after a period performing with the surf rock group The Beachcombers, he joined Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend and John Entwistle in London to form The Who. In their prime, the Mod "maximum R&B ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock
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