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Top 5 Keith Richards Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Moments

Wednesday, December 18: 3 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Keith Richards inducting the Ronettes in 2007

He’s a Rolling Stone, one of rock and roll's greatest guitarists, a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee and so much more. He’s Keith Richards. Born on December 18, 1943, in Dartford, England, Richards celebrates his 70th birthday in 2013, so we're taking a look back on some of his most memorable moments at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Richards inducted a handful of talented artists and always made his appearances memorable – as only Keith Richards could.

Keith Richards Inducts Chuck Berry at 1986 Induction Ceremony: “It’s very difficult for me to talk about Chuck because I lifted every lick he ever played.”

 

Keith Richards Inducts Johnnie Johnson and James Burton at 2001 Induction Ceremony: “It’s only rock ‘n’ roll. You’ve got to laugh. A sideman needs humor, incredible patience and usually more money than he ever gets.”

 

 

Keith Richards Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony moments live

what guitars does Keith Richards play?GET A BEHIND-THE-SCENES LOOK AT SOME OF KEITH RICHARDS' AND RONNIE WOOD'S MOST FAMOUS GUITARS!

 

Keith Richards Inducts ZZ Top at 2004 Induction Ceremony: “When I first saw them I thought, I hope these guys are not on the run because that disguise is not going to work, man. You’re ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, Rolling Stones, Inductee, Hall of Fame

A Never-Before-Heard Johnny Cash Album Gets Release Date

Thursday, December 12: 3 p.m.
Posted by Alexandra Fagan
New Johnny Cash album: Out Among the Stars

“'I Walk the Line' was a hit in November of 1956, that’s about a year before I was born, so it really is a part of the world that I know. But that’s the way it seems with great songs and great artists. Their impact on people is such that you can’t imagine what the world would be like or sound like without them.”

That was Lyle Lovett describing the first Johnny Cash song he ever heard, when he inducted Cash at the 1992 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony (watch video of Lyle Lovett inducting Johnny Cash into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame).

“I Walk the Line” hit Number One on the country Billboard charts and crossed over into the pop Top 20. Nearly six decades after "I Walk the Line" – and more than a decade after his passing in 2003 at age 71 – new, never-before-heard material from The Man in Black is scheduled for release in Spring 2014.

Pictured (l-r): 1943 Martin acoustic guitar played by Johnny Cash during his Sun Records recording sessions from 1955 to 1958; c.1955 suit worn by Johnny Cash during his time with Sun Records ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Hall of Fame, Johnny Cash, History of Rock and Roll

Gallery Talk: Duane Allman's 1959 Gibson Les Paul Guitars

Thursday, September 19: 11:30 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Duane Allman's highly prized 1959 Gibson Les Paul guitar, on exhibit at the Rock Hall

Please note that these guitars are no longer on exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio.

Few guitarists made as lasting an impression in such short order as Duane Allman. Beyond his work with the his namesake group and principal architects of Southern rock, the Allman Brothers Band, Duane was an in-demand session musician. A fixture at Muscle Shoals, Duane's playing can be heard on records by Aretha Franklin and Wilson Pickett, among others, and he famously traded licks with Eric Clapton on Derek and the Dominos' 1970 release Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

This 1959 cherry sunburst Gibson Les Paul was acquired by Duane in the fall of 1970, after he fell in love with the instrument jamming with a band called the Stone Balloon in Daytona Beach, Florida. The guitar can be heard on the seminal Allman Brothers Band live concert recording At Fillmore East. Recorded at the famed NYC concert hall on March 12 and 13, 1971, sprawling jams such as "Whipping Post," inspired blues including a cover of "Statesboro Blues" and fiery, jazz-inspired epics like "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" showcased Allman's near-singular dexterity and versatility ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Gallery Talk, Inductee, Hall of Fame

John Lennon, Yoko Ono and the Opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Tuesday, September 3: 2:41 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
The 1964 Gibson J 160E played by John Lennon, on view in the Museum's Beatles exhibit

After a groundbreaking in June 1993 and the realizaition of architect IM Pei's stunning vision, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum opened to the public on the shores of Lake Erie in September 1995. The day culminated with a benefit concert at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, where an incredible roster of rock and roll legends took the stage: Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Al Green, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin, Johnny Cash, the Pretenders, John Fogerty, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop, George Clinton, the Kinks, John Mellencamp, Bruce Springsteen, Booker T and the MGs, Eric Burdon and Martha Reeves. It was just the start.

One of the first pieces of rock and roll history ever loaned to the Museum came from Yoko Ono: the 1964 Gibson J 160E played by John Lennon and used extensively throughout his career. The unique acoustic guitar was part of a collection Ono presented to the Museum on October 13, 1994 and also included handwritten lyrics, a pair of Lennon's eye glasses, Lennon's guitar from the 1965 Beatles concert at Shea Stadium and more.

The Gibson acoustic guitar, however, remains "one of the most precious artifacts that we have in the Rock ...


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Stories behind the Guitars of Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones

Tuesday, August 20: 12:21 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Picture of Keith Richards' 1959 Gibson ES-355 electric guitar

In 1975, Ronnie Wood replaced Mick Taylor as guitarist for the Rolling Stones. It was another turning point for the band: “Ronnie was damn good glue for the band. He was a breath of fresh air,” said Richards. He and Richards went back to the band’s default rhythmic style, playing together to create the sound of a single intricate guitar. This compositional style had not been played consistently since Brian Jones’ tenure in the band. Wood helped to revitalize the band’s music and spirit, and it proved to be exactly what the Stones needed.

“’Beast of Burden’ is a good example of the two of us twinkling felicitously together,” said Richards. Wood’s slide guitar and pedal steel work made a big impact when recording and also on stage, and the chemistry between Wood and Richards can be heard when listening to Rolling Stones songs such as "It's Only Rock and Roll," "Hey Negrita," "Miss You," "Far Away Eyes" and "Start Me Up." 

These two Rolling Stones video clips go behind the scenes, highlighting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's latest major exhibit Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction, on view through March ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Rolling Stones, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Smashing Design: Building the Rock Hall's Piano

Wednesday, July 17: 11:31 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Testing the "smashed guitar" built into the Rock Hall's piano.

This week, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in partnership with Play Me, I'm Yours unveiled a unique piano designed by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame exhibit designer John Sloboda. "The represented act of smashing the guitar through the top of the piano is an attempt to catch the 'lightening in a bottle' moment when something happens where there's a little bit of danger mixed with excitement," says Sloboda of the Rock Hall's piano design that features a guitar "smashed" into the top of the piano. "Plus, having the electric guitar with the piano feels a little more rock and roll, and seemed fitting because the Rock Hall sponsored the piece."

Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland International Piano Competition teamed up to present Play Me, I'm Yours, curating an interactive art installation composed of 25 uniquely decorated pianos that will be placed throughout Northeast Ohio, including the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. The idea is to encourage people to meet, connect, communicate and express themselves through the shared experience of musical performance.

Dubbed "Black Magik," the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's piano was inspired by ...


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New Guitars on Exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Tuesday, July 16: 1:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
A unique bass played by Red Hot Chili Peppers' bassist Flea is among the newly installed instruments

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s artifact collection represents a diverse group of artists – much like the genre of rock and roll itself. The exhibits chronicle rock and roll history from its earliest days right through the new millennium, and visitors to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum will find clothing, handwritten lyrics, personal effects and much more. Among the Museum's most treasured pieces are the instruments.

The Museum's collection of rare instruments used in recordings and live performances includes drums, microphones, even flutes and a dulcimer, and the instrument most often associated with rock and roll: the guitar. There are approximately 20 guitars on permanent exhibit in the Museum’s atrium alone, and the instruments are rotated every six months. The guitars focus on Hall of Fame Inductees as well as non-inductee artists – both legendary and contemporary. Today, 10 new guitars that represent Inductees – including Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead, Jimmy Cliff, Mike Mills of R.E.M., Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and 2012 inductee, Steve Fossen of Heart – and non-inductees Eugene Hutz of Gogol Bordello and Mike Dirnt of Green Day were placed on exhibit ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit

A Long, Strange Trip: Pete Sears' One-of-a-Kind Bass Guitar, "Dragon"

Monday, July 1: 12:29 p.m.
Posted by Greg Harris
Pete Sears with his long-lost custom bass guitar named "Dragon"

In June 1978, Pete Sears and his Jefferson Starship bandmates narrowly escaped a riot following a cancelled concert in Germany. Amid the chaos, much of the band's gear was left behind, including Sears' one-of-a-kind bass created by famed luthiers Doug Irwin and Tom Lieber – the men responsible for Jerry Garcia's most iconic instruments. Sears never played the guitar live, and he never thought he'd see it again. Thirty-five years later, however, the missing bass has resurfaced. 

While a member of Jefferson Starship in 1976, Sears commissioned Irwin and Lieber (the latter working at the Doug Irwin Custom Shop) to build a custom bass dubbed "Dragon." Grateful Dead fans will recognize the work of both artisans, as they had hands in creating a series of iconic Jerry Garcia guitars, including "Rosebud," "Lighting Bolt" and "Tiger," which were all exhibited as part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Grateful Dead: The Long, Strange Trip exhibit that was on view from April 12, 2012 to March 24, 2013. 

The bass' resemblance to Garcia's famous guitars was no coincidence: the designers used the same piece of wood as Garcia's "Tiger" to build Sears' "Dragon ...


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