The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


SHELBY MORRISON :: Blog

Celebrity Sightings: Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman, David Arquette, Seether and Neon Trees tour the Rock Hall

Tuesday, May 31: 12:07 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Each year, more than 100 musicians, celebrities and artists tour the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. This past holiday weekend, we were pleased to welcome actors David Arquette and Danny DeVito along with his wife actress Rhea Perlman, as well as the bands Seether and Neon Trees to the Museum.

Check out photos from their tours at the Museum below! (You really never know who you might run into while you're here!)

Danny DeVito
President and CEO of the Rock Hall Terry Stewart, actress Rhea Perlman, actor and director Danny DeVito, and Rock Hall exhibitions coordinator Shelby Morrison at the Museum on Saturday, May 28, 2011. Of his visit to the Museum, DeVito called the Rock Hall "far out..you gotta see this" via his Twitter page.


Actor David Arquette (center) toured the Rock Hall with a friend (left) and Terry Stewart (right) on Friday, May 27, 2011. Arquette particularly enjoyed the Museum's Elvis exhibit pictured here and also on the actor's Twitter page.


Rock band Seether visited the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Friday, May 27, 2011 for the first time while touring through Cleveland. Of the items in the Museum, singer Shaun ...


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The Frankie Sardo Story

Thursday, February 11: 1:45 p.m.
Posted by Shelby Morrison

Frankie Sardo is not a rock and roll star. He never sold a million albums or reached the top of the charts. He is not a household name. However, he is a vital character in one of the most important chapters of rock and roll history. Frankie Sardo was the opening act for the 1959 Winter Dance Party at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa, which was the last concert performance for Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper. The three music legends were killed when their plane crashed following their performance at the Surf Ballroom on February 3, 1959. A little over 51 years after that fateful night, Frankie Sardo returned to the Surf Ballroom for the first time.

In a continuing partnership with the Surf Ballroom, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum co-sponsored a luncheon with the Surf as part of the Winter Dance Party event on February 6, 2010, in Clear Lake. The luncheon featured a one-on-one interview with Frankie Sardo. This interview was the first time Sardo has publicly spoken about his memories and stories surrounding the tour.

Sardo never wanted to be a rock and roll star. He was invited ...


continue Categories: Event, Education

The Real Story of the Santana Blues Band

Wednesday, November 18: 10:07 p.m.
Posted by Shelby Morrison
Gregg Rolie thanks the audience at the AMM Janis Joplin Tribute Concert on November 14, 2009. Photo:

There are few things better that come out of our education programs than the real “behind the music” style stories shared by the artists and musicians who we celebrate. Such a story was told to me this past weekend by the co-founder and lead singer of Santana, Hall of Fame Inductee Gregg Rolie when he was in town to perform with fellow Inductee Michael Carabello for our 14th Annual American Music Masters series honoring Janis Joplin.

In most of the biographies you will read about Santana, they are rather ambiguous about the details of how the band was actually formed. You read about how Gregg Rolie and Carlos Santana were both in San Francisco in the 1960’s and then magically, there was Santana. When Gregg Rolie said to me, “you know how Santana really formed, don’t you?…it was in a tomato patch.” I knew I was about to be let in on a rock and roll secret.

This is how it really happened.

The origins of the Santana Blues Band, which later became just Santana, lie in a chance meeting between keyboardist and lead singer, Gregg Rolie and guitarist, Carlos Santana. The two knew of each other ...


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