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Graham Nash Gets High with Jimi Hendrix and Brian Jones at a Frank Zappa Concert

Wednesday, November 27: 2:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Exclusive interview with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Graham Nash

 

In this exclusive Rock and Roll Hall of Fame interview with Hall of Fame Inductee Graham Nash, the musician talks about his experience getting high with Jimi Hendrix at a Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention concert, looking for Rolling Stones member Brian Jones.

"Jimi Hendrix and I once went to the Royal Albert Hall to see Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention. During the intermission, we spotted Brian Jones up in one of the boxes, and we wanted to go and get high with Brian. So, we got up from our seats, and we started to move along the seats and a spotlight found us. Now, quite frankly we were both on acid, so this bright light hitting us in the face when we thought that we were invisible was quite shocking to us, but we managed to make it all the way to Brian, to the box that Brian was in, and we managed to get higher than we were."

 


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame

The Byrds' Eulogy for John F. Kennedy: "He Was a Friend of Mine"

Friday, November 22: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Folk rock pioneers and 1991 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees the Byrds

In the early Sixties, Roger McGuinn had been playing with David Crosby and Gene Clark, billing themselves as the Beefeaters. When Chris Hillman and Michael Clarke joined that group in December 1964, they changed their name to the Byrds. Folk rock pioneers, the Byrds were once described by McGuinn as "Dylan meets the Beatles.” Fittingly, the group's first single, “Mr. Tambourine Man,” was written by Bob Dylan and reached Number One. They'd score another Number One hit in 1966 with "Turn! Turn! Turn!," based on a Bible passage set to music by Pete Seeger, but it was McGuinn's inspired reframing of a traditional folk song that made a poignant statement on 1965's Turn! Turn! Turn! album, transforming "He Was a Friend of Mine" into a eulogy for John F. Kennedy, two years after he was assassinated on November 22, 1963.

In 1965, the Byrds were charging forward, building their sound around the three-part harmonies of McGuinn, Clark and Crosby, and McGuinn's shimmering, jangling 12-string Rickenbacker guitar. Their album Turn! Turn! Turn! was released at the end of the year and its title track would go to Number One, but “He Was a Friend of Mine ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, History of Rock and Roll

Jerry Fuller and the Amazing True Story of Ricky Nelson's "Travelin' Man"

Friday, November 22: 9 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller wrote "Travelin' Man"

In 1960s Los Angeles, California, an elite group of studio session musicians came together and played on hits for the Beach Boys, the ByrdsRicky Nelson, Elvis Presley, Simon and GarfunkelPhil Spector's "Wall of Sound," Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Jan & Dean, the Monkees, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, 5th Dimension, Tijuana Brass and Johnny Rivers among others. From "Be My Baby" to "California Girls;" "Strangers in the Night" and "Mrs. Robinson;" "You've Lost that Lovin' Feelin'" and "Up, Up and Away;""Viva Las Vegas" to "Mr. Tambourine Man," the group dubbed "The Wrecking Crew" played on some of rock and roll's most-beloved songs. “The musicians really are the unsung heroes of all these hit records,” noted Nancy Sinatra. And now the world will know their story – if all goes to plan.

Watch + Listen: American singer, songwriter and record producer Jerry Fuller tells the story of how he wrote "Travelin' Man" for Sam Cooke, recorded it with Glen Campbell, and how the demo went in the garbage before finding its way to Ricky Nelson. (From The Wrecking Crew: The Untold Story of Rock & Roll Heroes)

Among the musicians in the "Crew" was guitarist Tommy ...


continue Categories: Elvis Presley, Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews

Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll: "Work With Me Annie"

Monday, November 18: 4:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Hank Ballard and the Midnighters

Born on November 18, 1927 (some sources note 1936), Hank Ballard wasn't the first to write smutty songs, but he was one of the more determinedly single-minded to exploit what he called the "raunch groove." His "Get It" was about, well, getting it. The title was startling coming after "The Shrine of St. Cecillia," the previous release by the Royals (as Ballard and the Midnighters were known prior to being labelmates with a "5" Royales). Its success, however, pointed the way. Ballard hit his stride with "Work With Me Annie," which is not about working. Reportedly toned down from its first draft, "Annie" still didn't leave much to the imagination: “Annie, please don’t cheat/ Give me all my meat / Oooo-weee / So good to me /Work with me, Annie / Let’s get it while the getting is good.” Needless to say, it went to the top of the R&B record charts in early 1954 despite being banned by the FCC. In a 1987 interview, Ballard recalled: "But [controversy] made the record hot. All that carryin’ on. 'What is this record about?' 'You can’t hear it on the radio – banned!' I tell you, in the Boston area ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Today in Rock, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

30 Years Later: Cyndi Lauper's "She's So Unusual"

Thursday, November 14: 4 p.m.
Posted by Shelby Morrison
2013 marks the 30-year anniversary of Cyndi Lauper's "She's So Unusual" album.

The year 1983 was a year of firsts for Cyndi Lauper – and the music industry. That year, Lauper released her first solo album, She's So Unusual, which became the first debut album by a female artist to score four Top Five singles: “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” “Time After Time,” “She Bop” and “All Through the Night." She won two American Music Awards, the Grammy for Best New Artist and went on to become the most nominated artist at the MTV Video Music Awards with nine nominations for the album She’s So Unusual, winning the Best Female Video Moonman. Because of her music, influence and artistic contributions, Lauper is featured in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Women Who Rock exhibit, which illustrates the important roles that women have played in rock and roll history, from roots to today. Cyndi Lauper was instrumental in the creation of the exhibit, as she visited the museum during the inception of the exhibit and advocated about how important the inclusion of women is to the story of rock and roll. She also played a major role as a spokeswoman for the exhibit. Women Who Rock: Vision ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll

New Elvis Presley Exhibition at Rock Hall

Wednesday, November 13: 2:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Elvis Presley

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in partnership with Elvis Presley Enterprises will open a new Elvis Presley exhibit on Friday, November 29, 2013, in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Main Exhibit Hall, in Cleveland. 

One of the most important artists of the 20th century and part of the first-ever class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees in 1986 (see the complete list of 1986 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees), Presley's status as a rock and roll icon is singular. Writer Lester Bangs may have said it best when he quipped: “I can guarantee you one thing - we will never again agree on anything as we agreed on Elvis.”

What's New in the Elvis Presley Exhibit?

More than 40 artifacts are on loan from Elvis Presley’s Graceland in Memphis, Tennessee. Highlights from the collection include a 1975 custom-made "SuperTrike" motorcycle and a selection of Presley's famous jewelry. The exhibit helps tell the Presley story, showcasing "The King" as a young man, with his official, wallet-size U.S. Army induction portrait that was taken and issued upon his arrival for basic training circa 1958; as ...


continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Elvis Presley, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Interview with Peter Asher, half of legendary duo Peter & Gordon

Monday, November 4: 4:30 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Peter Asher in 2011 / photo by Michael Weintrob

Peter Asher’s legendary music career began in 1964 with the formation of Peter & Gordon. In 1968, Asher became head of A&R for the Beatles newly formed record company, Apple Records. Three years later, Asher decided to literally head in a different direction and moved to the U.S., where he founded Peter Asher Management. Peter Asher Management became one of the most successful artist management companies in America, handling artists such as Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman, James Taylor, Linda Ronstadt and Carole King. Asher has produced 12 Grammy Award-winning recordings, and in 1977 and 1989 was honored individually with the Grammy Award for “Producer of the Year.” Playing select dates now, Asher stopped by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, to talk about his recent projects, keeping current, and being among the first people to ever hear the Beatles "I Want to Hold Your Hand" when Paul McCartney was staying at his house.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Tell us about the dates you're playing now...

Peter Asher: It's not really a tour it's just occasional dates. I have so much fun doing it. To be honest, I ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame, Exclusive Interviews

Remembering Maxine Powell and Motown's Finishing School

Wednesday, October 23: 4 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
(l-r) Maxine Powell and Rock Hall director of community programs Ruthie Brown at Rock Hall in 1997.

Although her official title was as a director of Motown's artist development department, Maxine Powell was much more than her role suggested. "Motown owes a great debt to Maxine," says Ruthie Brown, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's director of community programs and friend of Powell. "The artists knew what she was trying to do, and deep down, they wanted her refinement. They mimicked the image of the average American teenager – white, black, it didn't matter. The crossover was extremely successful. Motown was 'the sound of young America," and Maxine helped Berry Gordy get that image across." Powell passed away on October 14, 2013. She was 98.

Powell worked with Motown artist during a pivotal period in Motown's meteoric rise, from 1964 to 1969, when she helped shaped the public – and often private – personalities of the Detroit label's biggest names. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Berry Gordy Jr., the founder of Motown Records, said that Powell “brought something to Motown that no other record company had,” adding of his artists, “She was tough, but when she got through with them, they were poised, professional and very thankful.”

Born in Texarkana, Texas ...


continue Categories: History of Rock and Roll, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Education, Exclusive Interviews
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