The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


Los Angeles Music Scene

1965

The Byrds play Ciro’s nightclub, galvanizing a new scene on the Sunset Strip. In June, their folk-rock version of Bob Dylan’s “Mr Tambourine Man” will spend a week at the top of the charts.

1965

The Beach Boys’ “California Girls,” a last gasp of the L.A. surf-pop sound, reaches Number Three.

1966

The Mamas and the Papas reach Number Four with “California Dreamin’.”

1967

The Buffalo Springfield climb to Number Seven with Stephen Stills’ “For What It’s Worth,” a song inspired by a police-disrupted protest march on the Sunset Strip in the fall of 1966.

1968

Having recruited Gram Parsons, the Byrds go country with Sweetheart of the Rodeo, recorded in Nashville.

1968

Poco, a band formed by former Buffalo Springfield members Richie Furay and Jim Messina, makes its debut at the Troubadour.

1968

Joni Mitchell and Graham Nash move into “Our House” on Laurel Canyon’s Lookout Mountain Road.

1969

The eponymous debut album by Crosby, Stills and Nash is released and quickly goes gold.

1970

David Geffen establishes Asylum Records. The first artist signed to the label is Jackson Browne. The label’s roster eventually will grow to include Linda Ronstadt, the Eagles, Joni Mitchell, J.D. Souther and numerous other Los Angeles musicians.

1970

Joni Mitchell’s Ladies of the Canyon, featuring “Big Yellow Taxi,” enters the Top 30 on the Billboard album chart.

1970

Don Henley arrives in L.A. from Texas. He will soon join Glenn Frey in Linda Ronstadt’s backing band.

1971

Carole King’s Tapestry, produced by Lou Adler, spends the first of fifteen weeks at the top of the album chart.

1971

Lenny Waronker becomes head of A&R at Warner-Reprise Records. His upcoming projects include his boyhood friend Randy Newman’s album Sail Away.

1972

Little Feat releases the classic album Sailin’ Shoes.

1972

The Eagles chalk up the first of many hits with “Take It Easy.” The song reaches Number Twelve. Three months later, “Witchy Woman” will do even better -- Number Nine.

1973

Warner Bros. pays $7 million for David Geffen’s Asylum label. The label is merged with Elektra Records, with Geffen remaining in charge.

1973

Gram Parsons dies of a drug overdose in Joshua Tree, California.

1974

Linda Ronstadt reaches Number One with the single “You’re No Good” and the album Heart like a Wheel.

1975

Tom Waits records Nighthawks at the Diner at the Record Plant and at Wally Heider Recording Studios.

1976

The Eagles’ Hotel California spends the first of a total of eight weeks at Number One.

1977

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours begins its reign at Number One on the albums chart.

1977

Randy Newman scores a hit single with “Short People,” which sits at Number Two for three weeks.

1978

Warren Zevon’s “Werewolves of London” reaches Number 21 on the singles chart.

1979

Two months after releasing his solo album Thanks, I’ll Eat It Here, Little Feat’s Lowell George dies of a heart attack in Arlington, Virginia.