The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum

Posts by Rock Hall

Remembering Hall of Fame Inductee Allen Toussaint

Thursday, November 12: 3:34 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Allen Toussaint inducted into Hall of Fame in 1998 by Robbie Robertson

Allen Toussaint was one of New Orleans' great musical giants. “He was a great and tremendously versatile musician, a real gentleman and one of the nicest people I’ve ever known,” said Hall of Fame Inductee Randy Newman. 

He was a gifted arranger, deft producer, engaging performer and masterful record executive. But perhaps most remarkably, he was among the rare songwriters whose musical vocabulary – though singularly recognizable – translated to myriad styles and elevated the artistry of musicians around the world.

"New Orleans and the world has lost a true musical genius," wrote Trombone Shorty on his Facebook wall. "Allen will always be one of the founding fathers of what New Orleans sounds like; he was a tremendous friend and mentor to me and other musicians in New Orleans. Everything I do is influenced by my musical upbringing in New Orleans – and Allen was a huge part of that. I thank him so much for it, and for all that he did."

His piano on Fats Domino records inspired the likes of Elton John. He produced records for Bonnie Raitt. He toured with Little Feat. He arranged the memorable horns for the Band's Last Waltz. He worked with Otis Redding ...

continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Exclusive Interviews, Event

Free Download: "Smokey Robinson in Song" Infographic

Friday, November 6: 10 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Click the image below to downland the FREE full-size Smokey Robinson infographic!

free Smokey Robinson infographic Motown and Smokey Robinson history biggest songs and career highlights illustrated Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

What songs define the career of Smokey Robinson? What are Smokey Robinson's most important tracks? From one of Smokey Robinson's first songwriting collaborations with Motown impresario Berry Gordy in 1959 to the Number Two 1981 pop hit "Being With You," this illustrated history and timeline of key musical moments in Smokey Robinson's career showcases the enduring impact of his music.

As part of its Digital Classroom, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's education department provides an introduction to rock history as told through the songs that shaped rock and roll.  Students and teachers can explore and find tools, strategies and resources including lesson plans, listening guides and exclusive multimedia content, including infographics like the one featured above.

continue Categories: American Music Masters, Inductee, Education

Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll: "Born to Run"

Tuesday, August 25: 1:55 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall


Bruce Springsteen Born to Run handwritten lyrics Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland Ohio

In 1975, New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen was hailed as the new Dylan, the next great rock poet, the music's last prophet of social relevance. His picture graced the covers of Time and Newsweek (the same week, no less).By the time his third album, Born To Run, was released, Springsteen had added another archetype to the rock and roll pantheon: blue-collar hero, working-man's star. Born To Run's title track consolidated 25 years of rock and roll history into a universal tale of proletarian angst rendered larger than life by Spector-esque production.

Springsteen's protagonist does little more than motor down New Jersey's Highway 9 to flee small town drudgery. But to hear him tell it, he's headed down the road to glory. As the centerpiece of the hours-long sets that mark Springsteen's career, "Born To Run" provided uplift and catharsis, with the singer and foil/sax player Clarence Clemons engaging in joyous musical and physical interplay (captured in a live film clip that ranks with rock's most exhilarating concert footage).

On the surface, "Born To Run" may be little more than a song about cars and girls. Dig deeper, however, and rock ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll

Julian Bond: "The Power of Rock and Roll brought Blacks and Whites Together"

Monday, August 17: 3:55 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Julian Bond speech, race and the history of rock and roll, 2010 Music Masters Cleveland, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

In 2010, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honored Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew as part of its annual Music Masters series saluting pioneering figures from the past half century. Among the many who took part in that weeklong celebration, in Cleveland, was Julian Bond.

An influential Civil Rights leader, politician, writer and professor, Bond, who passed away on August 15, 2015, provided among the more poignant remarks at the tribute to Domino and Bartholomew. He spoke of rock and roll's power to unite and the courage it required to deliver.

This is the full transcript of Bond's speech from the November 13, 2010 Music Masters tribute to Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew, including a poem he wrote when he was in college and published in first Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee newsletter.

"While [Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew] records were storming the charts, major challenges were being mounted against the forces of racial segregation and discrimination — the segregation that kept black and white rock and roll fans from listening to music or dancing together, that kept Domino and Bartholomew and their bands from restaurants and hotels on the road, the segregation that kept African Americans from voting ...

continue Categories: American Music Masters, History of Rock and Roll, Exclusive Interviews

The 50th Anniversary of the Beatles at Shea Stadium

Saturday, August 15: 3:47 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

On August 15, 1965, the Beatles performed before a crowd of more than 55,000 ecstatic fans in New York City’s Shea Stadium. That’s a lot of screaming.

The legendary performance was the first ever in a major U.S. stadium, and is known as perhaps the most famous Beatles’ concert – well, maybe that infamously cut short rooftop gig ranks higher.

The 1964 Ludwig drum kit played by Ringo Starr during that Shea Stadium gig was also used on six Beatles’ albums, as well as during their last official concert appearance in San Francisco’s Candlestick Park in 1966. Can you think of a more iconic drum set?

John Lennon’s 1964 Rickenbacker electric guitar used during the performance was one of two guitars made especially for Lennon while visiting America for the first time in 1964, and used on the Beatles second-ever Ed Sullivan appearance. It soon became his primary instrument, and still has the set list from Shea Stadium taped to the side.

Hard to believe that 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of that Beatles’ milestone – and that Beatlemania would still be alive and well! Both the Ringo Starr Ludwig drumkit and the John Lennon Rickenbacker ...

continue Categories: Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Exhibit, Today in Rock, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, The Beatles, Inductee, Hall of Fame

Keith Richards Praises the Blues and Calls Sgt. Pepper's "Rubbish"

Wednesday, August 5: 3:40 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Keith Richards inducts Chuck Berry into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 1986 Induction Ceremony photo

Rolling Stones’ guitarist Keith Richards recently opened up about the genre he calls “the original music form in the world.”

“I recognize power when I see it,” Richards told Esquire magazine in an interview published in August 2015. “There's something incredibly powerful about the blues — the raw blues. There isn't a piece of popular music probably that you've heard that hasn't in some weird way been influenced by the blues.”

Richards also shared that he’s been lucky enough to meet and perform with all of his blues-based heroes. “All of these guys that I used to listen to – the amazing thing is that even at my age, I'm living in a place where I know all of my heroes, warts and all, and still love 'em,” said Richards. “Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis — man, if that is not 'Mr. Rock 'n' Roll,' I don't know who is. Little Richard; I love those cats.” Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard were all part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's first class in 1986.

“It’s very difficult for me to talk about Chuck Berry, because I lifted every lick ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of the Blues, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Hall of Fame

The E Street Band's Nils Lofgren: "what Chuck Berry was to Keith Richards, Keith Richards is to me"

Tuesday, August 4: 5 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Interview with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Nils Lofgren

During a recent tour stop in Cleveland, Ohio, we caught up with 2014 Hall of Fame Inductee, much-lauded solo artist, E Street Band guitarist and incredible storyteller Nils Lofgren who shared how he first became interested in playing the guitar, a faithful night seeing both the Who and Jimi Hendrix in concert, the influence of Keith Richards and the Rolling Stones, the Beatles; and the "god awful" music he and Bruce Springsteen made while backing Chuck Berry in Cleveland at the Rock Hall's opening concert.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Your first instrument as a child was the classical accordion. How did that come about? 

Nils Lofgren: Well, I spent eight years on the South Side of Chicago, where I was born. When I was five, every kid played accordion. I asked to take lessons, and I did. After the waltzes and polkas, you move in to classical or jazz. My teacher sent me in to classical accordion. It was an enormous musical study and backdrop, and, as a young teenager, I fell in love with the Beatles and Stones. Through them, I discovered the British invasion, the American counterpart of great rock bands in the 60s; Stax ...

continue Categories: Inductee, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Exclusive Interviews

Yoko Ono and U2 Unveil Moving John Lennon Tribute

Thursday, July 30: 5:18 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

This week marks the 40th anniversary of John Lennon's deportation order being overturned by the United States government. To mark the occasion, Yoko Ono, Bono and the Edge of U2 were on hand for a ceremony on Ellis Island, where a giant tapestry depicting the island of Manhattan as a yellow submarine with a waving Lennon was unveiled. July 29 was declared John Lennon Day in NYC.

John Lennon United States Green Card 1976 New York City

“They let him stay, and he is still here. Yoko, he is still here,” said Bono during a series of remarks.

John Lennon and Yoko Ono moved to New York in September 1971. When his temporary visa expired in February 1972, the Nixon administration sought to have him deported, using a 1968 conviction for marijuana possession as ammunition. After a years-long battle, Lennon finally won the right to stay in the United States in 1975, receiving his green card in 1976. That green card, pictured above, is among the items featured in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's Beatles exhibit.

"He didn’t sail across the Atlantic in an ocean liner or a yellow submarine. He didn’t come in on a third-class ticket looking for a job in Hell ...

continue Categories: The Beatles, Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll
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