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The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential "5" Royales Songs

Thursday, April 9: 5:21 p.m.


“Baby Don’t Do It”
From the first rolling piano chords through the soaring vocals and swinging horn arrangement, this first “5” Royales appearance on the charts signals that they are here to rock and take no prisoners.

“Help Me Somebody”
Starting out as a gospel-tinged slow drag,  the “5” Royales throw a double-time curve into the bridge of this song, their second big hit.

“Monkey Hips and Rice”

This song dares you keep your seat, tugging you up to dance to its infectious beat and the compelling interplay between vocal and saxophone.
“When I Get Like This”

The matchless lead vocal on this song is simply stunning, transforming heartbreak and loss into a sonic masterpiece.

This song embodies all of the soul and swagger of the “5” Royales in one catchy, finger-snapping hit, punctuated by Lowman Pauling’s masterful guitar work.

“Messin’ Up”
A decidedly exuberant romp that starts out in overdrive and never lets up for a moment – messin’ up was never more fun.

“Dedicated to the One I Love”
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees the Mamas and the Papas’ and the Shirelles’ versions of this song are put to shame by the “5 ...

continue Categories: Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, History of the Blues, History of Rock and Roll

Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll: "That'll Be the Day"

Monday, August 11: 12 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Buddy Holly "That'll Be the Day" original recording and Buddy Holly exhibit at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Buddy Holly embodied the well-mannered, first-generation rock and roll star. He aroused hysteria among teenagers, charting seven Top 10 singles in 1957 and 1958, but with his horn-rimmed glasses, bow tie, conservative haircut and winning smile, he wasn’t reviled by disapproving parents. He changed the definition of exactly who could become a rock star. Holly melded his love of country music and rockabilly into likable, catchy rock and roll tunes that stand as classics. Yet success wasn't just handed to Buddy Holly.

"That'll Be the Day," his first hit, was a chart-topping million seller. But it was slow to catch on, and Holly had been struggling professionally for well over a year beforehand. The unlikely inspiration for the song was actor John Wayne, who used the title phrase repeatedly in the 1956 western The Searchers. Holly and drummer Jerry Allison wrote the tune with producer Norman Petty, and then recorded it in Nashville during Holly's aborted stint as a Decca recording artist. Decca released two Holly singles, neither of them were "That'll Be the Day."

Seven months later Holly and Allison recorded the song again, as members of the newly formed Crickets. This time the ...

continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll
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