The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


inductee :: Blog

GDTK

Saturday, April 18: 12:07 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Green Day Delivers Punk Rock Blast of Dookie-era Hits

Inducting Green Day, the guys from Fall Out Boy noted: [quote]

After accepting their Inductee honors, the guys from Green Day – Tré Cool, Mike Dirnt and Billie Joe Armstrong – took the stage to thunderous applause from a crowd full of fans.

[billie joe quote]

In a decade-spanning, three-song set, the 90s punk revivalists performed the title track from their much-lauded American Idiot album, before shifting to Dookie-era hits "When I Come Around" and "Basket Case."

Dookie, the band's third album and major-label debut in 1994, became their mass-market breakthrough, with U.S. sales of well over 10 million copies. One of Dookie's most popular tunes was "Basket Case," a song largely inspired by bandleader Billie Joe Armstrong's own struggles with panic disorder and the emotional distress he experienced before his condition was diagnosed. 

"Basket Case" embodies most of Green Day's salient qualities, dealing with its subject matter with both humor and compassion while delivering the hard-hitting, melodically infectious songcraft for which the band is known. Mark Kohr directed the music video, which was shot in an abandoned California mental institution, and was a staple on MTV ...


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Punk, History of Rock and Roll, Event, Hall of Fame, Exhibit

JJTK

Saturday, April 18: 11:54 a.m.
Posted by Rock Hall

Dave Grohl joins Joan Jett and the Blackhearts for Surprise Induction Performance

Not long into the 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in Cleveland, Ohio, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts – Joan Jett, Kenny Laguna, Dougie Needles, Thommy Price and Gary Ryan – were joined on stage by 2014 Hall of Fame Inductee Dave Grohl, of Foo Fighters' fame.

[jett quote?]

The group delivered a raucous version of "Cherry Bomb." The song is the opening track of the Runaways' – composed of Los Angeles-area teenagers Cherie Currie, Joan Jett, Sandy West, Lita Ford and Jackie Fox – self-titled 1976 debut album, and its glitter-beat decadence, punk-rock aggression and defiantly explicit sexuality was an unprecedented achievement delivered with electrifying effect. With its near X-rated lyrics that promise to "have ya, grab ya, 'til you're sore," "Cherry Bomb" resonated  with youthful rockers around the world.

Tonight, it was part of a bombastic set that also included "Bad Reputation" and "Crimson and Clover" with Tommy James, and the soundtrack to Joan Jett & the Blackhearts Hall of Fame Induction.

See, hear and learn more about Joan Jett and the Blackhearts at the Rock Hall's 2015 Inductee exhibit.


continue Categories: Inductee, History of Punk, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Event, Hall of Fame, Exhibit

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential "5" Royales Songs

Thursday, April 16: 5 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

Over the course of two decades – from 1945 to 1965 – 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the "5" Royales created a remarkable body of work that laid the foundation for a host of music that followed in its wake. With pivotal recordings and performing techniques that helped define a variety of styles under the rock and roll umbrella, the group is responsible for some of rock's first true standards. Here are my picks for essential listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee the 5 Royales songs


“Bedside of a Neighbor” (1952)
The very first record by the “5” Royales was a variation of the Thomas Dorsey tune “(Standing By the) Bedside of a Neighbor.” It was recorded in August of 1951 and released on Apollo Records in January of 1952 under the name The Royal Sons Quintet. They put in a great vocal performance with the lead sung by John Tanner, but don’t miss the gospel piano played by the group’s friend Royal Abbit.

“Baby Don’t Do It” (1952)
While their contract with Apollo was to record gospel music, the group quickly began recording secular music as well; at first under the name the Royals, and then by the time of this hit song ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble Songs

Thursday, April 16: 2 p.m.
Posted by Jason Hanley

The studio and live LPs released during the last seven years of 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan's life ensured his place in Stratocaster immortality and influenced the next generation of blues guitarists. With Double Trouble bandmates Tommy Shannon on bass, Chris Layton on drums and Reese Wynans on keyboards, the Texas-born blues-rock powerhouse forged a sound that influenced and inspired countless players around the globe.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble

“Love Struck Baby”
The first song on the debut album from Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, Texas Flood, released on June 13, 1983 – it was also the first single from the album. But don’t be fooled if it sounds too good to be a new band; Stevie Ray formed the band in 1978, and the final lineup had come together in 1980 consisting of SRV, Tommy Shannon (bass), and Chris Layton (drums).


“Pride and Joy”
This song is a great example of a Texas Shuffle (in which the guitar plays a triplet pattern over the quadruple meter of the band). Listen to how in the opening Stevie Ray plays all the off beats with an upstroke on the guitar to emphasize them. It makes for a great ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Jimi Hendrix, Hall of Fame

Percy Sledge and the Southern Soul Revolution

Thursday, April 16: 9 a.m.

When Percy Sledge first tried to make a record in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, the white owner of the area’s first record label refused to work with him. Saying that he preferred to stick with white country and pop artists, the producer slammed the door in the young singer’s face. A few years later, Sledge was the area’s biggest star, with a Number One hit that defined “the Muscle Shoals sound” and helped launch one of the era’s most significant music scenes. Sledge’s spare, aching ballad – the still-iconic “When A Man Loves A Woman” – not only set a musical template for deep soul, but also reflected the unique musical alchemy that made Muscle Shoals and southern soul into an international symbol of cultural change.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Percy Sledge RIP

Crucial to Sledge’s success, and that of Muscle Shoals soul, was his records’ mixture of black and white. He worked with a mostly-white group of young studio musicians, including producer Rick Hall and fellow Hall of Famer Spooner Oldham, who now embraced the chance to cut records with black artists. Additionally, Sledge was one of the great practitioners of the musical hybrid that became known, appropriately enough, as “country-soul.” Sledge’s ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Rolling Stones, History of Rock and Roll

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Bill Withers Songs

Wednesday, April 15: 2 p.m.

In a recording career that lasted only 15 years, but left a lasting legacy, 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Bill Withers mastered the vocabularies of the acoustic singer-songwriter, R&B, disco and even mainstream jazz, while maintaining a distinctive personality as a composer and vocalist. Here are my picks for essential Bill Withers songs.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Bill Withers

“Ain’t No Sunshine”
A breakthrough hit from Just As I Am (produced by Hall of Fame Inductee Booker T. Jones), “Ain’t No Sunshine” set the framework for the Bill Withers sound with its sparse arrangement, direct,  no-frills lyric and in the pocket groove. It was also a bona fide hit, reaching Number Three on the Billboard 100 in 1971.

“Grandma’s Hands”
“I was one of those kids who was smaller than all the girls. I stuttered. I had asthma. So I had some issues," recalled Bill Withers. "My grandmother was that one person who would always say that I was going to be OK. … When you're a weaker kid, whoever champions you becomes very important to you." This song is a tribute to those healing hands.

“Who Is He (and What is He to You?)”
Just the right undertone ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, History of the Blues, Event, Hall of Fame

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Joan Jett and the Blackhearts Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 4 p.m.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Joan Jett and the Blackhearts created a potent mix of hard rock, glam, punk, metal and garage rock that sounds fresh and relevant in any era. The group's biggest hit, “I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll” (Number One in 1982) is a rock classic – a pure and simple a statement about the music’s power. The honesty and power of their records make you believe that rock and roll can change the world. Here are my picks for essential songs that do just that.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Joan Jett and the Blackhearts

“Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah)”  
This song is a cover of glam rocker Gary Glitter’s 1973 hit, delivered with the authoritative punch as only Joan Jett and the Blackhearts can.


 

“I Love Rock ‘N Roll”
Joan Jett's version of this Arrows song was ranked Number 89 in the "100 Greatest Guitar Songs" by Rolling Stone magazine, and was Joan Jett and the Blackhearts first Number One.



Crimson and Clover
This reworking of the Tommy James and the Shondells classic reached Number Seven, wonderfully capturing the Jett and company's ability to do tender and tough will equal aplomb.

“I Love You Love Me Love ...


continue Categories: Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players, Hall of Fame, History of Punk

The Rock Hall's Guide to the Essential Green Day Songs

Tuesday, April 14: 12 p.m.

Building on the trail blazed by the Clash, the Sex Pistols and the Ramones, 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees Green Day are the perennial punk adolescents, true to the ethos of every basement and garage-rock band that preceded them. Here are my picks for essential Green Day listening.

2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee Green Day

“Green Day”
Pitchfork said of this early Green Day outing: “It's raw stuff, but even at this point Green Day's records were at least halfway decently recorded, unlike most of their peers' tin-can-and-twine set-ups.”  This 1990 recording – although technically rough around the edges – showcases the group's knack for revved-up melodies.

“2000 Light Years Away”
“2000 Light Years Away” kicks off the 1992 album Kerplunk, Green Day’s last album on the indie Lookout! Records and the group’s first with drummer Tré Cool. The explosive blast of punk energy comes with a fantastic sing-along chorus and lyrics about genuine adolescent longing.

“Longview”
“Longview” was Green Day’s breakout hit, the first single released from their 1994 major label debut Dookie. PopMatters said: "This song didn’t become an instant classic of its genre merely because Armstrong said the word "masturbation" on the radio — it's all ...


continue Categories: Hall of Fame, Inductee, Exhibit, History of Rock and Roll, Rock's Greatest Guitar Players
Page 1 of 6. next