The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame + Museum


record :: Blog

Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's Why Archives Matter

Friday, November 1: 1:34 p.m.
Posted by Rock Hall
Inside the Rock Hall's Library and Archives

Recently, music journalist Ann Powers wrote a piece for NPR titled "Holding Music History in Your Hands: Why Archives Matter." In it, Powers notes that she's planning "to head next to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library in Cleveland, which has served thousands of visitors – students, scholars and plenty of just-fans – since opening last year." In advance of her visit, she connected with Rock Hall Library and Archives director Andy Leach, who shared a story of one young visitor connecting with the Sex Pistols, in a new way.

"A couple of weeks ago, our head archivist told me a story about a teenage boy who came in with his family," Leach explained. "They were all looking at books and periodicals and watching videos, and the kid asked whether we had his favorite album, the Sex Pistols' Never Mind the Bollocks, on vinyl. He'd never actually seen a vinyl copy until then, and he was very excited. He very reverentially played the record in our Archives Reading Room while he pored over the album cover. He listened to the entire first side before it was time for his family to leave, at which point he begrudgingly rejoined ...


continue Categories: History of Punk, Library and Archives

Celebrating Record Store Day In Cleveland – and Beyond

Friday, April 19: 4 p.m.
Record Store Day is on April 20, 2013

I’m a native Clevelander, and have always been a keen record shopper. I bought my first record with my own money, Lulu’s “To Sir, With Love,” at the Disc record store in Severance Center mall, across  from the cinema where my Mom and I had just seen the movie starring Sidney Poitier. As a kid I shopped ‘em all: Record Revolution and the Record Exchange on Coventry Road in Cleveland Heights; Tommy Edward’s Record Heaven in the Memphis-Fulton Shopping Center in Cleveland and the venerable Record Rendezvous in downtown Cleveland, among others. 

When I moved to New York City in the late Seventies, my record jones sent me out on regular excursions around Greenwich Village, both east and west. Sounds on St. Mark’s Place was my East Village haunt, while Bleeker Bob’s, closer to the West Side, was a little more out of the way. It took awhile for me to warm up to Bleeker's – or rather – for the store to warm up to me. I experienced my own ...


continue Categories: Event
Page 1 of 1.